One of the most widely used power tools for carpenters is the table saw. For carpenters that don’t work exclusively in the shop a portable jobsite table saw is essential. For this Head-to-Head we’re focusing on corded portable 10″ jobsite table saws. We are not including cordless table saws in this test as we plan on doing another head-to-head exclusively for cordless table saws later this year as several are available now.
Accessories 10″ 24-Tooth Carbide Blade, 2x Blade Wrenches, rolling stand, blade guard assembly, push stick, miter gauge, rip fence 10 in. 40-tooth carbide-tipped blade, throat plate insert, smart guard system, rip fence, miter gauge, push stick 32T carbide-tipped blade, rip fence, miter gauge, push stick, and wrenches Rip Fence, Miter Gauge, Smart Guard System, Push Stick, Blade Change Wrenches 24-tooth SKILSAW Carbide-tipped blade for ripping, miter gauge, self-aligning fence, guard system including anti-kick back device, insert plate, push stick and wrench
Todd – Yes I was referring to the “flatness” which some reviewers were complaining about. Thank you for your response. My problem is that I don’t have any workspace in my garage. It is a tiny garage which we use for storage so I need a saw I can store there but will be doing the actual cutting in the driveway so I have to move it out there to cut, then store it back in the garage in a tight space. I thought maybe a job site saw like one of these would work well but I would be making furniture and “woodworking” projects so maybe not. thanks for your feedback.
How many teeth a saw blade has will determine how smooth the cut is. Most blades have from 24-80 teeth. The exceptions to these blades are specialty material specific blades (i.e. for masonry) In general, the more teeth a blade has the smoother the cut will be. The higher tooth count means that the cut speed will be slower as well. You cannot overcome a slower cutting speed by pushing harder on the material. This is a common mistake newbies make. All this will do is cause kickbacks when the saw blade catches and tosses the object back towards to the user at dangerously high speeds.
We compiled this set of data and created a ranked set of results by assigning a 1-2-3 rating to the relative values of the test measurements. Then we ranked the saws for overall as-manufactured table flatness. As a point of interest, a typical sheet of copy paper is approximately .004 inches thick. Flatness measurements varied from 0.0 to .09 inches.
SawStop was second, also with features no other saw had. The blade height adjustment wheel covers the entire range with one full turn of the wheel. There was some discussion about micro adjustments being more precise for dado and rabbet cuts, but in practice, we found we could easily get to a specific height without trouble. SawStop also moves away from the bevel lock lever and instead integrates it into the height wheel. By pulling the lock toward you, it is released and easily moved to your desired angle. Let go of the wheel and it’s locked back in place without having to hold it and use a second hand to work the lever.
It’s often overwhelming when looking for new power tools and products online. So many features, specs and brands etc to research and review. So, what should you look for when buying a new table saw? One thing we always mention is to make sure you read as many table saw reviews as you can before purchasing one, this will insure you have the best table saw for your requirements.

These tools can be classified into three types, such as the compact, bench top and job site saw. As compared to the stationary models they are smaller and more lightweight. Furthermore, the heavier materials used in their construction are seriously reduced to keep their weight down. Most units are equipped with a 15 amp 120V motor which delivers no more than 2 hp. As it was mentioned before, the size matters and it is an important factor to consider when purchasing a woodworking machine.
IMPORTANT REVIEW UPDATE (10/4/2016): After doing some additional testing with pressure-treated lumber and heavier stock, we [initially] found some issues with the Bosch REAXX saw that we couldn’t explain—except to say that it didn’t have the power we expected for cutting through denser wood. The blade exhibited a significant drop in speed during many common ripping cuts, and it even stalled out entirely at other times. We contacted Bosch and worked directly with them to determine the nature of the issue (which appeared to have to do with the saw’s electronic speed control). Here is the initial statement from Bosch on the matter:
We took all of the data from the RPM and AMP measurements and added them to come up with the final performance rankings. For each saw we added up the total percentage decrease in RPM’s (for each material type) and added that to the total percentage increase in AMP’s (for each material type). This gives us a relative comparison of each saw over all 6 sets of data.
Skilsaw SPT70WT-22 is a portable 10 in. Worm Drive table saw designed for ripping and is the first of its kind to hit the market. This Skilsaw has a powerful Dual-Field 15 amp motor that is powerful enough to handle even the toughest jobs. The motor has a smooth startup and runs cooler, so it lasts longer. With a small, compact size, easy to transport size, this portable saw has a lot to bring to the table. Skilsaw’s SPT99-12 is also this same table saw but also includes a rolling stand which allows you to easily transport and move this saw around the job site.
Not everyone needs to use the miter gauge on a table saw since there’s typically going to be a miter saw around. If you do, you’ll like the positive locking detents at common angles. This saw felt like it was the weakest when pushing our 2x PT material through. Despite the ranking, it doesn’t feel under-powered – you just need to take your time. You won’t find a lot of bells and whistles on this model, but for $279, we don’t have many complaints.
One thing you must be aware of with a contractor saw is the fact that they can be a lot more difficult to move from job to job, this is something that must be considered before purchasing. For thicker and harder type woods a cabinet table saw maybe the best way to go, especially for the long-term benefits, but for the average mid-sized contractor it’s still a great option. Read More
Contractor saws are a perfect balance between functionality, manoeuvrability and price. These sorts of saws are perfect if you have bigger projects that you’re working on and will stay on site for a few months. This is due to the fact that they are a lot less portable, but that being said they are a great in-between saw as they still have great rip capacity and overall cutting power.
For some table saws, a dust collection system is just a bag that collects the dust generated from your table saw. This might do the job perfectly well for many novice table saw users, whilst others might benefit from a more sophisticated dust collection system. Either way, it’s of paramount importance to make sure that you pick up any dust generated by your table saw, as it could be dangerous in the long term to both you and your family.
Move the wood to and then "through" the spinning saw blade slowly and steadily. It's alright to use your hands while you're still at least a foot or so from the blade, but once the end of the board or sheet nears the blade, you should use a pushing stick to keep the wood moving and to keep your fingers away from the blade. Even an experienced carpenter can have a lapse in concentration or a slip that can lead to serious injury.
We used the Freud calibration plate on each of the test saws to measure runout. We removed the new Diablo blade, installed the calibration plate, and raised the trunnion to its maximum vertical adjustment. Before measuring the runout, we placed a black mark on the calibration plate to give a consistent starting position for the runout test. The same iGauging dial indicator provided the test measurements, only this time, the units were set to read out in mm. TBB noticed that in the initial saws, the movements were sufficiently small to need the smaller metric units.
A magnetic switch is also good from a safety standpoint but may not be necessary on these smaller versions. A magnetic switch prevents the saw from starting back up if it loses power during a power outage. Basically, the power outage will turn off the saw. This is good because if for some reason the power were to come back on when you were not near the machine, the material could be shot out of it or damage the saw.
Delta 36-L352 10 in. contractor table saw is a heavy duty table saw. This big guy is no joke! Its 15 A, 3 HP motor is not only powerful but smooth. This Delta table saw also has a HUGE rip capacity of 50-52 in. and an 82 in. table, so there won’t be much this table saw can’t handle. Its integrated BIESEMEYER fence system, precision bevel gauge, and bevel dial work together to help you get highly accurate cuts down to the nearest 1/4 degree and 1/64 in. Now that’s accurate! Other notable features are its bi-level dust extraction system which helps you keep your workspace clean, large blade opening, and SURE-LOCK dual front cranks for easy access. This table saw is ideal for the pros.
As the name indicates, it has a V-belt and a pulley system through which the power is transferred. Given the much higher torque and power, these drives are more suited for heavy-duty sawing jobs, providing better efficiency when cutting thicker wood variants. Additionally, a belt drive throws up much less dust as the motors are mounted far away from the blade. I would say other than that; they are less safe and more costly.
Ridgid seems to get mixed reviews from users, maybe due to its lower price point, but continues to impress us in head to head competitions. With this edition, Ridgid’s 15 amp motor powered through cuts better than any other saw we tested. Sure it was close, but it consistently beat out each competitor. That power does come with more vibration than some of the others though.
There are three areas of importance that you’ll need to protect – your ears, eyes, and arms. To start with, you’ll want to make sure that you have a pair of earplugs or noise reducing headphones that will help to minimize the negative effects of being exposed to loud noise for prolonged periods of time. While this may seem like a small solution, it is something that you’ll want to make sure you take into full consideration – to avoid doing so could be extremely detrimental to your overall health.
You can’t talk about the best portable jobsite table saw without talking about portability. Portability boils down to a couple of important features. First and foremost, weight has a huge impact on how easily you can transport the saw, especially if it has to go into the bed of a truck rather than a trailer. If you’ve got a trailer, then a wheeled stand becomes your best friend. We looked at both.
Designed to be Portable – In case you hadn’t already gathered from the above section, this is a table saw from Bosch that is clearly designed to be portable. If you’re going to need a table saw that can be moved on and off of a worksite with little effort, you’ll definitely find that to be the case with the Bosch 4100-09 and it’s included Gravity Rise Stand.

Brad – Won’t be anytime soon. I’d offer a few thoughts though on this topic. First off, for this type of testing it’s just not feasible for us to do any long term testing that would be required to evaluate your concern. You’re right, most jobsite table saws have less than perfect fence systems. The rack-and-pinion style that DEWALT, Hitachi and some others use are far more accurate over the long haul than the “clamp” style. Lastly, for lots of guys they are transitioning to track saws for work that requires a really precise cuts or they cut critical pieces in the shop. In a perfect world we’d get shop precision out of jobsite saws, but the reality is due to weight limits its unlikely. Thanks for the feedback.

The fence on a table saw is one of its defining features and allows for precise, square, and repeatable cuts. Not all fences are equal though and a poorly built fence is a deal-breaker, in my opinion. Not only will a poorly built and implemented fence affect the quality of your cuts, but a fence that moves or is not square to the blade can cause your material to bind and kickback.
You cannot build wood cabinets or make furniture without a quality tool that provides maximum accuracy and precision. There are still many people who prefer to use the manual saw rather than the electric saw, but the main disadvantage of using the standard saw is that it doesn’t provide a smooth and clean cut. On the other hand, despite the fact that electric saws cut the wood at a very high speed and reach in the middle of the wood with no effort, they provide a very smooth cut.
It’s not until you get a bunch of saws side by side in the shop that you start to see the difference between a $300 saw and a $500 saw. While the motors are all 15-amp, the more expensive saws have features like soft start to prolong motor and gear life, electronic feedback to maintain blade speed and gearing to maximize torque. If you look under the saws, you’ll see that the more expensive saws also have much beefier motor carriages and better-quality blade-adjusting mechanisms.
The product line “little sister” to the more powerful Delta 36-L552 model, the 36-L352 sports many of the same high end safety and utility features, but in a more compact package with an improved workspace geometry and a 3 horsepower motor rather than the 36-L552’s beefier 5 horsepower motor. It’s still a Delta UniSaw where it counts; this is clearly evident in both the quality of build and the performance level of this professional grade cabinet saw.

Due to the position of the motor, dust collection is often an issue with these units, especially in comparison to the cabinet type. However, an industrial vacuum is usually a small and worthy investment which should solve the issue effectively. The main advantage of this type is the fact that it’s much cheaper than its nearest equivalent – the cabinet type.
Accessories 10″ 24-Tooth Carbide Blade, 2x Blade Wrenches, rolling stand, blade guard assembly, push stick, miter gauge, rip fence 10 in. 40-tooth carbide-tipped blade, throat plate insert, smart guard system, rip fence, miter gauge, push stick 32T carbide-tipped blade, rip fence, miter gauge, push stick, and wrenches Rip Fence, Miter Gauge, Smart Guard System, Push Stick, Blade Change Wrenches 24-tooth SKILSAW Carbide-tipped blade for ripping, miter gauge, self-aligning fence, guard system including anti-kick back device, insert plate, push stick and wrench
Blade guards are an important safety device and should never be removed from the saw. You want to find one that rises up parallel to the table so it is always on top of the material you are working with. The purpose of this blade guard is to protect you from the spinning blade. While some woodworkers find them annoying, the safety they provide is well worth the inconvenience.

In order to measure the blade speed we used a digital laser non-contact tachometer. A piece of reflective tape was adhered to each saw blade just behind the carbide tooth, so that the tape would be just above the top of the wood cutting surface, allowing us to capture the blade speed during the cuts. We used a power-feeder to ensure that all the material was pushed through each saw at the same feed rate. In the photo above you can see our test set-up with the power feeder, a decibel meter to the left, the digital tachometer in the center, and the amp meter on the right. If you look really closely at the saw blade, the piece of reflective tape is to the left side of the blade near the power feeder.
In recent years, there has been a cloud of controversy surrounding the inherent safety issues surrounding the table saw. SawStop developed a flesh detection technology that pulls the blade below the table surface 3 milliseconds after coming into contact with skin. It really created a new class of table saw that, as of June 1st, finally has some competition in the form of Bosch’s REAXX.
The bench top saws have a compact yet ergonomic design. Thanks to their lightweight feature, more and more people prefer to use them in their workshops. Despite the fact that they are not equipped with wheels, they can be considered portable, because they are very small. As such, they can easily be carried and transported from a place to another by almost anyone. Also, in comparison to the jobsite saws, the benchtop saws have a very limited rip capacity.
Our table saw review quickly showed that today’s portable table saws are light-years ahead of the small-saw offerings from a decade ago. They feature big-capacity cutting, greatly improved safety features and attached stands for easy setup. And saws in the upper price range rival stationary saws in accuracy and quality of cut. We limited our review to saws that included a stand with wheels and ones that could rip at least 24 in. wide, only the best table saw for our readers!
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