As accidents and injuries are common when using large power tools like this one, it’s important that you look for safety features such as a dust collection system. Inhaling the sawdust that comes off the wood can make you sick, but this system does a good job of removing the dust from your work area. The collection port itself has a convenient on the cabinet too.
For homeowners without the luxury of a huge garage to fit their enormous table saw, DEWALT’s DWE7480 is a compact alternative to bulkier machines with the same wood slicing power. Measuring 25.8" x 26.5" x 13.9", the DWE7480 hosts a 15-amp motor that cuts at an unbelievable 4800 rpm with a ten-inch blade, meaning this small package packs big performance — and with adjustable rear feet that are designed to allow users to level their table saw on uneven surfaces, you’ll be sure to get a clean, precise cut every time, no matter how rugged the terrain. An additional dust port makes collecting your sawdust a breeze — especially if you attach an optional shop vac extension.
I am looking to upgrade from my first table saw which is the Ryobi that you reviewed (had to find something cheap that was decent). I do a lot of rip cuts, as well as fine precision cuts for laminating and joinery required for frames, furniture, etc. I am looking at the Skilsaw and the Dewalt 7480 and cannot decide which would be best for me. Any insight would be helpful!
Finally, hybrid saws combine the lighter weight of the contractor saw with the more powerful motor and sturdier construction of the cabinet saw, at a price that’s easier for the occasional woodworker to stomach. They can run about $1,200 or so, and weigh in at under 300 pounds. Their motors are generally in the 1.5 to 1.75 HP range, and can be used with standard 110V outlets.
The more table size you have, the more support you have which is always a plus, not only for convenience but safety too. There are right side extensions that can be purchased for table saws that increase the table saw’s capacity to get to the center of a 4 x 8 sheet of wood. Although most saws have a rear band that supports the wood as it exits the saw, an additional safety measure is to rig up an outfeed support of some kind in addition to this rear bar. Be sure that the outfeed support you set up is ¼” lower than the table saw is.
Just used this saw for the first time today and I love it. Instructions for putting the stand together were not very clear. There's a lot of very detailed reviews here, so there isn't much I can add that hasn't already been said; but one thing I didn't know until using it is that the rear legs are angled further back than the front ones to provide more stability when pushing stock through the saw. Only used it a few times today, but it was a pleasure to use.
Cutting a board to length by using the fence as a guide is one of the most dangerous yet very common techniques. The fact that it’s quite common among DIY-ers doesn’t make it safe. In fact, it’s extremely dangerous and can lead to fatal consequences. There is a high risk of kickback if you’re using this particular technique. Needless to say, the forces involved are immense, and you’ll end up with a piece of wood in your face. One could say – “But, I’m wearing safety goggles!” Even though it may be true, goggles won’t do much against a dense piece of wood flying straight to your face a few hundred miles per hour.
With many different options available to both experienced and aspiring woodworkers, choosing the right cabinet saw for your workshop can feel like a daunting task. To help you narrow down your choices and better assess your needs, we’ve reviewed the ten best cabinet saws on the market. Regardless of your intended purpose, there is something here to fit everyone’s needs and budget.
There are two major points that affect post-calibration table saws: fence quality and overall stability. A fence works by grabbing hold of the table edge and clamping into it. The best fences, like Biesemeyer, have three points of contact. They’re just not where you’d expect. All three are on the front, leaving none on the back. With a wide cast metal front clamping system, the front is pulled flush and self-aligns. It requires a solid locking mechanism to ensure the fence doesn’t move during cuts, but it is very possible.
While your table saw is unplugged, take the time to clear and clean the work surface, removing any debris that could negatively impact the smooth path of the wood you will be cutting. Then, lower or raise the blade to where the blade gullet (the curved section between each blade tooth) is equal with the top of the piece of wood to be cut. Also, make sure that your saw's dust exhaust port is clear and open and that a bag is in place to catch any excess sawdust.
Is your blade angle taken care of! Good – that means you’re almost done with your safety check process. Now you need to check the material you’re working with. You can’t just pick up any random piece of wood and expect it to fit properly. You’ll have to use wood that is flat and straight. Wood that is curved or that is slightly bowed or cupped will cause issues for you when you try to cut it down – if you need to work with this sort of material you’ll need to find another cutting tool, like the reciprocating saw (click here for full guide).
Powermatic is a name that you’ll see a few times on our list of the cabinet saws because this company is responsible so many great models like this 1792010K PM2000, 5HP 1PH Table Saw, with 50-Inch Accu-Fence System. The built-in caster system makes it easy to move the cabinet saw anywhere around your shop with minimal eft, and it comes with a quick release riving knife that reduces vibrations to prevent accidents. At 39-inches high, it also lets you use the saw without stopping over.
Reviewers recommend these models for easy transport to jobsites and for easy storage in a small workshop. Portable table saws come in two types. Benchtop saws sit on top of a workbench and are light enough to pick up and carry; jobsite saws are mounted on folding stands, usually with wheels for easier transport. The main drawbacks of a portable saw are its lower power and smaller table, which makes it tricky to cut larger lumber and sheet material such as plywood. Prices for portable saws start at less than $200, but the best-rated models typically cost $300 or more.
Hitachi C10RJ 10 in. job site table saw features a powerful, industrial grade 15 A motor that operates at 4,500 RPM, giving you the ripping power to cut through even the toughest woods. This Hitachi table saw has a 0-45 degree bevel and height adjustments. One of the best features is its large work table which also has a telescoping extension, allowing rip cuts up to 35 in. wide! When you pair the power of this table saw with the bevel range and table size, you’ll be able to power through any project you throw at it! Other great features include: front mounted controls, oversized controls, integrated safety switch, and a soft start function that helps decrease recoil at startup.
Depending on how often you work with wood and the type of wood that you use, you may find that this SawStop PCS175-PFA30 1.75-HP Professional Cabinet Saw Assembly is better suited to your needs than some of the company’s more expensive models are. This saw features a smaller base and a shorter extension table that take up less space, but you can use the fencing system to extend the size of the table working with your boards.
You can’t talk about the best portable jobsite table saw without talking about portability. Portability boils down to a couple of important features. First and foremost, weight has a huge impact on how easily you can transport the saw, especially if it has to go into the bed of a truck rather than a trailer. If you’ve got a trailer, then a wheeled stand becomes your best friend. We looked at both.
Todd – Yes I was referring to the “flatness” which some reviewers were complaining about. Thank you for your response. My problem is that I don’t have any workspace in my garage. It is a tiny garage which we use for storage so I need a saw I can store there but will be doing the actual cutting in the driveway so I have to move it out there to cut, then store it back in the garage in a tight space. I thought maybe a job site saw like one of these would work well but I would be making furniture and “woodworking” projects so maybe not. thanks for your feedback.

I see the ovens next to 'fridge. Isn't that a no-no? The heat from the ovens make the 'fridge run to cool more when the ovens are used, upping the electric bill. They are also too far from the center of preparation. I would have put them against the long counter. It would also allow counter space by the fridge to place items when putting them in or taking them out of the 'fridge.
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