A magnetic switch is also good from a safety standpoint but may not be necessary on these smaller versions. A magnetic switch prevents the saw from starting back up if it loses power during a power outage. Basically, the power outage will turn off the saw. This is good because if for some reason the power were to come back on when you were not near the machine, the material could be shot out of it or damage the saw.

Above are the results for RPM Blade Speed while cutting 3/4″ plywood. In the left column is the no-load blade speed and the right column is the lowest recorded blade speed during the cut. The drop in blade speed is fairly small ranging from 6% for Hitachi and Ridgid, 7% for Makita and SawStop, 9% Bosch, 11% DEWALT, 14% SkilSaw, and 24% for the Delta.
Great match-up and informative… however I too noticed that “No Load” RPMs varied quite a bit from chart to chart – for the same saw. We would expect some variation of 50 RPM as you had mentioned, but not 500 to 800. See that the Hitachi changed from 4400 down to 3700, Delta jumped from 3700 to 4400, Rigid from 3650 to 4350. Upon closer scrutiny… the order of “No Load” RPMs used in first chart may have been used in all subsequent charts. When the “Load” results were ordered by hi-to-low ranking, is it possible that the “No Load” data was not kept with its saw? If so, that changes the %drop results slightly for most RPM No-Load/Load,Speed charts. No too terrible. Lots of data… Good overall presentation though for use to make informed decisions. Thank you!
Deciding on what portable saw to get is not an easy task. There is so much out there on the market and such a wide combination of options. You can use our top 5 picks to get a taste of what’s out there and maybe find your perfect portable power saw right off the bat. However, we feel that you should also be equipped with the knowledge to go out and make your own decisions on portable table saws. We are going to run through the most important factors and features to consider before you make your purchase. These are factors that have a direct impact on performance.
2. The two models I mentioned above appear to only differ in the type of blade included. Your team tested the second model, which I think comes with a premium Freud Diablo blade . . . but what is its model # or exact description? Also, the model you did not test comes with a Skil blade, but again, I cannot find its description anywhere. Can you help by supplying its model #. ??

The stand is collapsible and wheeled like others, but it’s not the gravity-rise style. You’ll have to use a foot to stabilize it while you pivot it up or lower it down. The lower locks are released with your feet and there’s some question about the long term durability of the releases. An open housing design has two major results – motor cooling should be more efficient but it trades off storage for an extra blade. There’s really way too much to talk about here, so check out our full review of this model.
The best overall performance in our testing was the Skilsaw SPT99-12. The Skilsaw was described by many of the TBB crew as a beast and the data reinforces that. Regardless of the type of material the Skilsaw SPT99-12 offered the lowest drop in RPM’s and the lowest increase in AMP draw. Following in second place is the Hitachi C10RJ and the DEWALT DWE7491RS in third place.
The rip fence has a nifty flipping action so you can hold 2 different positions. This is an awesome feature if you’re cutting especially narrow workpieces. One of the dangers of ripping substantial pieces of lumber is breakage or the saw itself toppling over. The rail extension gives wonderful stability and allows you the freedom to undertake ambitious projects in complete safety.
These tools can be classified into three types, such as the compact, bench top and job site saw. As compared to the stationary models they are smaller and more lightweight. Furthermore, the heavier materials used in their construction are seriously reduced to keep their weight down. Most units are equipped with a 15 amp 120V motor which delivers no more than 2 hp. As it was mentioned before, the size matters and it is an important factor to consider when purchasing a woodworking machine.
If you’re looking for one of the most powerful products on the market, you’ll find those such options within the 3-5 horsepower range. As you can likely imagine, these are products largely targeted at professionals looking to use their table saw on a day to day basis. If you’re a hobbyist or occasional contractor who doesn’t necessarily want to shell out a fortune on a table saw, you should find that between 1-2 horsepower does the job.

The market for table saws is one that’s incredibly varied and that’s something that you’ve likely already noticed from just one look at the different table saw types. Reading on into our table saw reviews and you’ll notice that there’s also a range of different brands offering table saw products. But which brand is best for you? With so many of them available, it’s hard to understand the difference and make a choice over the best brand for you.

Craftsman 10 table saw Craftsman Radial Arm saw 10Craftsman 16 direct drive scroll saw Chicago Electric 10 compound Slide Miter saw Wagner power painterBlack and Decker rotary saw and jig sawCraftsman corded drill. Craftsman 10 compound miter saw.Cleaning out my shed and am trying to downsize. $550 or best offer and its all yours. Ill help load but wont deliver. Great Christmas gift for that ha...

If you are making a cut that will require your hands to get close to the blade, (within 6 inches) use a push stick or two to eliminate the chances of your hand touching the blade. If this is a big concern for you, maybe consider a saw that uses flesh detection to stop the blade. The additional cost of the saw will be instantly appreciated the first time you need it.


As you’ll be able to tell from our table saw reviews, the different types of table saw are largely targeted at different types of users. If you’re likely going to need to transport your table saw around from site to site, it’s a portable table saw that you’re going to want to opt for. It’s pretty clear that the portable variation of table saw is designed with maneuverability in mind, meaning you can just pack it up with your kit and leave.
It features an 1850W motor which delivers more than enough power for any heavy-duty task and DIY project. Dewalt is well-known for designing quality tools, and they didn’t disappoint with this particular model either. The fence system offers 610mm of rip capacity. As you may assume, even though it’s a portable unit, you can easily cut large pieces of wood to a particular size.
To learn about how table saws perform in real people's homes, we consulted owner-written reviews at retail sites like Amazon, Home Depot, Lowe's, and Sears. User reviewers don't have the breadth of experience that many experts enjoy, but they can provide keen insights on the model they bought, including things that might not crop up in the relatively short time professional reviewers have to spend with a given saw.
Bosch has a long legacy of manufacturing great tools for generations, and the Bosch 4100-09 upholds that tradition. Slightly heavier than the Dewalt DWE, it comes with an innovative stand that makes it stand out. The gravity-rise stand cuts down the time to set this table saw by quite a lot, reducing set up time. It also comes equipped with pneumatic wheels that can roll on almost any surface without much hassle. Another selling point is the advanced T-slot miter gauge that makes sure that you get the right cut every time without fail.

As you probably might think a quality model must have some safety feature. This is not a toy; this is a powerful tool which can cause serious injury. That’s why, safety features like splitters, anti-kickback or riving knives are there to minimize these risks. When you have your fingers inches away from the blades that spin with a power hard to imagine, you need to be very careful. Therefore, safety features like the ones above will help you keep your hand intact.
The ultimate safety feature though is the advanced sawstop system that can save users from severe injuries and accidental amputations. Here’s how it works: the blade of the TGP252 is charged with an electrical signal during operation. When human skin comes into contact with the blade, the signal is altered by the body’s natural conductivity. An aluminum brake immediately slams into the blade to bring it to a complete stop, and the stopped blade’s angular momentum drives it down below the surface of the table, preventing any potential secondary contact injuries. This entire sawstop process occurs in an astonishing 5 milliseconds. You simply cannot find a safer professional grade cabinet saw on the market today.
The TruePower 01-0819 may look like a miniature version of a table saw — and that’s because it is! Ideal for hobbyist modelers and DIYers looking to tackle minor jobs, the 01-0819, while lacking the same power and performance as its larger, pricier counterparts, is a steal at under $50. A must for any toymaker’s workbench, this bite-sized machine measures in at 8.5" x 7" x 7", and while it lacks important parts like a guide fence, it gets basic 1/2" wood or foam board cutting jobs done, slicing through softer materials with ease.
The CNS175-TGP36 SawStop is a 10 in. contractor table saw with a 45-degree bevel and a rip capacity of 36.5 in. Other than that, we think this is a pretty cool table saw for a few different reasons. First, the price is about half of all other SawStop table saws, and we know money talks (actually, it yells)! Second, like all other SawStop table saws, it has the integrated flesh sensing technology, so you can be sure you’re going to keep all your digits. Also, it has some pretty impressive power; it’s powered by 15 A motor so you’ll be able to tackle whatever you need. The last of our favorite features is its portability. For being a contractor saw, it’s pretty easy to pack up and move around.
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Not everyone needs to use the miter gauge on a table saw since there’s typically going to be a miter saw around. If you do, you’ll like the positive locking detents at common angles. This saw felt like it was the weakest when pushing our 2x PT material through. Despite the ranking, it doesn’t feel under-powered – you just need to take your time. You won’t find a lot of bells and whistles on this model, but for $279, we don’t have many complaints.

Thanks for the work you put in on this. I am retired now and have been researching these types of saws as I wish to begin doing some building of storage shelves and deck furniture. As a beginner, I did not wish to spend huge amounts of money until I was sure it was something I would be staying with for a while :-). Very informative and happy to see the way you did your testing (on the video). I spent 20+ years testing or working with security software testers and totally understand the issues of testing (almost anything) in a fair and honest way. Your work is greatly appreciated!.
As you probably might think a quality model must have some safety feature. This is not a toy; this is a powerful tool which can cause serious injury. That’s why, safety features like splitters, anti-kickback or riving knives are there to minimize these risks. When you have your fingers inches away from the blades that spin with a power hard to imagine, you need to be very careful. Therefore, safety features like the ones above will help you keep your hand intact.
We don’t always post the point totals when we do a shootout like this because it gets complicated – you have to decide what the important features and performance categories are, determine how much weight each one should hold, and then actually hash out the scores with the team. That said, some of these table saws scored so close to each other that I didn’t feel it was fair to just leave it up to the rankings.

Both of the products that we’ve featured so far in our top table saw reviews have clearly been targeted at the higher end of the market and that’s signified by their high price point. With that in mind, we think it’s worth including a cheaper table saw that’s clearly targeted at not so much professional contractors and more just hobbyists. That’s where this product from Ryobi comes in. Whilst it doesn’t offer much of the same power and flexibility as the options from Bosch and Dewalt, it might just do the job.

There are three areas of importance that you’ll need to protect – your ears, eyes, and arms. To start with, you’ll want to make sure that you have a pair of earplugs or noise reducing headphones that will help to minimize the negative effects of being exposed to loud noise for prolonged periods of time. While this may seem like a small solution, it is something that you’ll want to make sure you take into full consideration – to avoid doing so could be extremely detrimental to your overall health.
Lowes had a Father’s day sale, on their Kobalt table saw with a folding/rolling stand and was $180.00, with more money off because I signed up for their credit card-so I bought it. It cuts fine, the fence locks on both ends,measurements seem ok, and it unfolds and rolls away very easily-I like it so far. I’m a home owner and I use it sporadically and treat it well, it does not appear to be very robust, so as a day to day, on the job site saw, probably not a good choice. I used to have a Makita table saw, with a terrible fence, unreliable ruler markings, and difficult to use blade guide that interfered with measurements, which you needed to do every time-a terrible saw, very frustrating to use. I have a Makita miter saw and it’s great, but the idea of buying a same brand because I liked one of their other products did not work out.
As you would expect, the most expensive saws made slightly smoother cuts. But the difference was negligible. The only saw that struggled to make smooth cuts in the super-thick oak was the Ryobi. In more common situations, like cutting 3/4-in.-thick material, Ryobi’s cut quality was fine. We found the blades included with all the saws to be adequate for most ripping tasks. But if you want cuts smooth enough for glue joints, you’ll have to invest in a better blade.
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