Almost all the features you like about the more expensive SawStop cabinet saws are available in this PCS31230-TGP236 3-HP Professional Cabinet Saw Assembly with 36-Inch Professional T-Glide Fence System, Rails and Extension Table, which costs much less. This model comes in a black finish with accents and features like its emergency stop button in a brighter red color that make those features easy to see. It also features a taller height designed to reduce strain on your back as you saw.

For homeowners without the luxury of a huge garage to fit their enormous table saw, DEWALT’s DWE7480 is a compact alternative to bulkier machines with the same wood slicing power. Measuring 25.8" x 26.5" x 13.9", the DWE7480 hosts a 15-amp motor that cuts at an unbelievable 4800 rpm with a ten-inch blade, meaning this small package packs big performance — and with adjustable rear feet that are designed to allow users to level their table saw on uneven surfaces, you’ll be sure to get a clean, precise cut every time, no matter how rugged the terrain. An additional dust port makes collecting your sawdust a breeze — especially if you attach an optional shop vac extension.


The compact saws are a bit more advanced than the bench top saws. They are equipped with plenty of impressive features and characteristics including direct-drive motors. In spite of their lightweight feature, most compact saws are powerful and provide a lot of benefits. With additional features like stands and extra surfaces made of cast iron, most of them resemble full-size models. However, they still have a rip capacity much smaller than other saws.
If you’re looking to squeeze the most possible power out of your table in terms of both strength and precision, it’s a cabinet table saw that you’re looking for. They’re what’s seen as a traditional table saw and the variety that most professional wood cutters use on a day to day basis. However, as the name suggests, this raw power and precision comes at the cost of portability. It’s pretty clear that cabinet table saws are designed to sit in one place and be used as a tool within a workshop environment.
The DEWALT DWE7480 Compact Job-Site Table Saw is obviously a very impressive tool and in our opinion, it’s the best on the market. That’s why we’ve chosen it as our top pick. The design is built with the contractor in mind and helps to ensure that you’ll never have to worry about the machine breaking down on you in the middle of a job or not being able to meet your demands. The saw is fairly light weight (coming in at only 53 pounds) and is powered by an impressive 15 amp motor that has a 20 inch rip capacity.

Obviously, given its size, the TruePower 01-0819 isn’t the kind of table saw you’d spring for to take on larger projects that require greater motor power — after all, it’s by no means revolutionary in the torque department. But for those who work with smaller materials or softer wood, the Gino Development TruePower 01-0819 Mini Electric Table Saw is a worthwhile, no-frills buy that’s easy on the wallet and can fit in virtually any space with plenty of room to spare.
Rockwell diverged from the crowd with this offering. For starters, the riving knife, anti-kickback pawls and blade guard are connected and remove as a unit. If you do remove them to make a non-through cut, you have to install the separate riving knife first. It’s not difficult, just different. This is the only saw with a right-tilting motor. We prefer left-tilting motors because it’s safer to make bevel cuts with the fence on the right side of the blade. There’s no port for attaching a vacuum cleaner, but there’s a large dust bag that does a good job of collecting sawdust. This saw cuts 3-9/16 in. at 90 degrees, 1/16 in. more than the next closest competitors, allowing you to rip a 4×4 in one pass. And like the Ryobi saw, it has a 30-in.-wide rip capacity.
Some table saws go one better than a splitter. Splitters are fixed. They do not move along with the blade. It also needs to be removed if you’re making cross-cuts or dado cuts. A riving knife, on the other hand, is fixed to the same part as the blade. This means it can move along with the blade. Riving knives don’t get in the way either so this is the best option.

Obviously, given its size, the TruePower 01-0819 isn’t the kind of table saw you’d spring for to take on larger projects that require greater motor power — after all, it’s by no means revolutionary in the torque department. But for those who work with smaller materials or softer wood, the Gino Development TruePower 01-0819 Mini Electric Table Saw is a worthwhile, no-frills buy that’s easy on the wallet and can fit in virtually any space with plenty of room to spare.


Miter gauges are one of those accessories that you may forget about in daily use, but then desperately need if you don’t have one. They’re used with table saws in order to cut angles that aren’t 90 degrees. The best miter gauges include hard stops at 90 degrees and 45 degrees, which are the angles that you’re most often going to be cutting at. The hard stops make it easy to set the miter gauge to those angles and cut away with confidence.
The ultimate safety feature though is the advanced sawstop system that can save users from severe injuries and accidental amputations. Here’s how it works: the blade of the TGP252 is charged with an electrical signal during operation. When human skin comes into contact with the blade, the signal is altered by the body’s natural conductivity. An aluminum brake immediately slams into the blade to bring it to a complete stop, and the stopped blade’s angular momentum drives it down below the surface of the table, preventing any potential secondary contact injuries. This entire sawstop process occurs in an astonishing 5 milliseconds. You simply cannot find a safer professional grade cabinet saw on the market today.
It’s worth remembering that contractor table saws are still going to be pretty portable because they’re designed to be used by contractors. That being said, unlike portable table saws, they don’t necessarily fold up into a compact position. This is largely because contractors tend to have the facilities needed in order to transport a larger bit of kit. The extra space that they take up in comparison to a portable table saw means that contractor table saws are able to offer a greater level of power and precision. Both of these points further support the fact that contractor table saws sit in the middle ground.

Hello, Thank you for your comment. We apologize for any issues our Top Table Saws of 2018 blog post has caused. It was not written to be a comparative review of the different saws but a list of the top saws that we are currently selling. It would be unfair to compare performance of a portable jobsite table saw to a industrial cabinet saw and then also compare them on price. If you would like to read a very good comparative post we suggest you check out ProToolReviews.com. They are not tied to any manufacturers and have a very unbiased opinion.
Cabinet saws are the prime choice for professional woodworkers. A more powerful induction motor, usually 3 to 5 HP, is enclosed in a cabinet, as part of a super-sturdy overall construction. This type of table saw is ideal for making smooth, straight cuts through hardwoods without worrying about excessive vibration. All that power and stability comes at a price, though. Low-end cabinet saws start around $2,300 and can go past $5,000 for industrial table saws.
If the aforementioned portable table saw is largely targeted at homeowners and those simply looking to complete the odd job, we’d definitely argue that a contractor table saw is aimed at well, contractors who need to transport their saw. You’ll find that a contractor table saw does offer some degree of portability, whilst still managing to maintain some of a complete table saw. With that in mind, some users describe this as the perfect sweet spot when it comes to table saws, offering a nice combination between power and portability.

Additionally, the W1819 also features a miter fence with flip stop for precisely angled cuts, and the blade can even be tilted left up to 45 degrees for angled cutting when working with bevels, compound miters and chamfers. Furthermore, the fence can be camlocked to keep it steady when making complicated cuts. There are few professional grade table saws that can match the ShopFox 1819 for power, performance features and control. Overall, it makes a fine addition to any working or hobbyist wood shop.


We love the Makita Contractor Table Saw for its convenient design and sheer power. The device is powered by a powerful 15 amp motor that enables it to work incredibly well and efficiently. The whole ensemble comes with a superior safety system, a miter gauge, a rip fence, and a 32 inch blade to ensure that you’re prepared to get going and get the job done as soon as you receive the package. We also appreciate the measures taken to protect the blade and machine during transportation like the case that encloses it underneath the table.
It’s not until you get a bunch of saws side by side in the shop that you start to see the difference between a $300 saw and a $500 saw. While the motors are all 15-amp, the more expensive saws have features like soft start to prolong motor and gear life, electronic feedback to maintain blade speed and gearing to maximize torque. If you look under the saws, you’ll see that the more expensive saws also have much beefier motor carriages and better-quality blade-adjusting mechanisms.
Contractors who do a lot of finishing work and interior/exterior trim work know the value of a good portable table saw. DeWalt has built the DWE7490X from the ground up as a stable and safe job site cabinet saw that can be used to make those precision cuts quickly and easily without the need to pre-fabricate materials and then bring them to the job site for final fitting.
The first step to take when using a table saw is to don all the appropriate safety gear that a responsible operator should use. This includes, at the bare minimum, eye protection and thick work gloves. It's also a good idea to protect your ears with ear muffs or earplugs and to consider a mask that will cover your mouth and nose to prevent the inhalation of fine saw dust particles.
In recent years, there has been a cloud of controversy surrounding the inherent safety issues surrounding the table saw. SawStop developed a flesh detection technology that pulls the blade below the table surface 3 milliseconds after coming into contact with skin. It really created a new class of table saw that, as of June 1st, finally has some competition in the form of Bosch’s REAXX.
In a video review at Tools of the Trade, finish carpenter Jesse Wright finds few negatives and a lot of positives for the DWE7491RS. Wright says this table saw is larger than he normally likes for a portable saw, but its size allows it to tackle tasks that would otherwise be out of reach of a jobsite saw and also makes it very solid and stable. The DWE7491RS also earns a perfect five-star rating from Popular Mechanics, which says it cuts well, is very stable, and has plenty of handy features. The reviewer's only complaint is that the saw is very loud.

The thing you might not like about it is the non-flat table top. Many people find this downside as quite a burden, especially if you’re processing perfectly flat wood. Also, the protective coating on the top side of this model is pretty subpar. In fact, it barely protects anything. Consequently, it will peel off quite quickly. As far as the price goes, it’s okay, but it could have been a bit cheaper.


The ultimate safety feature though is the advanced sawstop system that can save users from severe injuries and accidental amputations. Here’s how it works: the blade of the TGP252 is charged with an electrical signal during operation. When human skin comes into contact with the blade, the signal is altered by the body’s natural conductivity. An aluminum brake immediately slams into the blade to bring it to a complete stop, and the stopped blade’s angular momentum drives it down below the surface of the table, preventing any potential secondary contact injuries. This entire sawstop process occurs in an astonishing 5 milliseconds. You simply cannot find a safer professional grade cabinet saw on the market today.
And finally, they all include a blade guard that can be removed and reinstalled without tools. Because a few sawing operations, such as non-through cuts, require you to remove the blade guard, we like saws that make this task easy. The Bosch, DeWalt and Ridgid saws have well-designed blade guards that are easy to remove and reinstall. The blade guards on all but the Porter-Cable and Craftsman also have a feature that holds the blade guard in the raised position to allow better blade visibility for setting up cuts.
Under the table, you’ll find plenty of space to store away your accessories. This is valuable if you’re working on site and don’t want to keep hunting down bits and pieces. You’ll be able to stash your arbor wrench and Allen wrenches close to hand. The rip fence also flips upside down and can be stored under the table. It’s this kind of attention to detail for a jobsite saw that’s always appreciated.
​The saw does not easily detach from the stand. Sometimes it’s beneficial to set the saw up as a bench-top saw, but the DeWALT 7491RS doesn’t come with quick release levers to accomplish this easily. In this case, you would have to use a drill to remove four screws to detach it from the stand. I wouldn’t recommend doing this unless you have to because over time the screw holes will strip.
Table saws in this best table saw review run the gamut in price and quality. You can buy a table saw for as little as $150, and if you use it just to occasionally rip a board, that may be all the saw you need. If you want a saw that’s easy to carry and you don’t need to rip sheets of plywood in half, look for a “compact” saw like the DeWalt DW745 (shown) or the Bosch GTS1031. If you have room for a little larger saw that’s slightly less portable but capable of wide rips, consider one of the best table saws we review here. And finally, if you want to build cabinets or furniture and have a big enough work area, you can step up to a stationary contractor’s saw like the Ridgid R4512 (shown), for about $650.
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