A 50 rpm deviation at those speeds is approximately 1% variance which is well within the tolerance we should expect from taking the readings at a precise instant of time. The meters were in constant motion and we took the reading off of a single video frame that represented our determination of no-load speeds. We report them as our instruments showed them. 1% is acceptable.
Bosch’s 4100-10 work site table saw is a sure win. Bosch never fails to impress us, and this table saw is no exception. It’s a 10 in. saw with a 25 in (right) rip capacity and a 47 degree left bevel. This Bosch table saw is powered by a 15A motor that reaches top speeds up to 3,650 RPM. Another feature we appreciate: its constant response circuits which continuously adapt the speed under load, giving you a continuous blade speed.
Before we get into some of the top features, we want to take a look at the design of this cabinet. As it uses an enclosed cabinet, you’ll find that the motor lasts longer because it doesn’t wear down due to constant exposure to dust. This cabinet also features convenient hand wheels on the front and sides that help you make quick adjustments before cutting or as you work.

One of the lightest and most compact table saws was also the most stable: Skilsaw. There’s no wheel base to the stand and the outward angled legs provide a wider platform than it may appear against its colleagues. In second place was DeWalt, also offering a wide platform, but without the amount of rigidity that Skilsaw has in their stand. Coming up in third was Bosch with its gravity rise stand followed closely by Ridgid. It’s important to note that none of the professional class table saws had any stability issues inherent to their extension locking—it was all in the stand.
This table saw isn’t going to provide near vibration-free performance, and you have to be extra careful about kickback since the base is not as heavy or weighted like a standard cabinet saw. Provided you are careful and work slowly though, it is possible to replicate the precisions of a heavy duty cabinet saw on the job site using DeWalt’s innovative DWE7490X.
At this point, you are wondering why this is not number 1. The problem is with all that power, precision, and all those great features; you can get only 18 inches of cut from it. This severely impacts the usability of the product. While it can still be used for some home based products, its use in a professional setup is fairly limited to smaller projects. It also only has a one year warranty which is pretty light.
If you’re looking for one of the most powerful products on the market, you’ll find those such options within the 3-5 horsepower range. As you can likely imagine, these are products largely targeted at professionals looking to use their table saw on a day to day basis. If you’re a hobbyist or occasional contractor who doesn’t necessarily want to shell out a fortune on a table saw, you should find that between 1-2 horsepower does the job.

For ideal usage, the on/off switch needs to be mounted on the front of the saw and should be easy to turn off with your knee or a swat without having to look at it to locate it. Most table saw models have a safety feature that is a plastic key that has to be inserted before the table saw can be turned on. Some may even have a way to padlock the switch.
The DeWalt DWE7480 is a 10 in. compact job site table saw powered by a powerful 15 A motor that has top speeds of up to 4,800 RPM. When this power is paired with its 24 in. rip capacity and 47-degree bevel, this table saw is able to power through even the hardest woods with great accuracy, so you can use it for projects ranging from shelving to trim to hardwood flooring. And despite all its power, this table saw is a lightweight at only 48 lbs. No matter what woodworking project you have in front of you, this DeWalt table saw is able to power through it!
High RPM: Rotations per minute are an important consideration when you are looking to buy the ideal portable table saw. It ensures that you can cut the wood/material a lot more efficiently and accurately. It also means that the thickness can be adjusted easily, and you can get a plank to the thickness that you would like. The high RPM also makes sure that the cut is relatively smooth and the rips do not show up in the form of uneven edges. On an average, most table saws have a 15 amps motor. It is the RPM that makes a big difference in performance. Anything above 4500 is fantastic.
If you’re looking to squeeze the most possible power out of your table in terms of both strength and precision, it’s a cabinet table saw that you’re looking for. They’re what’s seen as a traditional table saw and the variety that most professional wood cutters use on a day to day basis. However, as the name suggests, this raw power and precision comes at the cost of portability. It’s pretty clear that cabinet table saws are designed to sit in one place and be used as a tool within a workshop environment.
The last type of table saw that we believe is worth mentioning on this page is something of a wildcard product. That’s because it’s not as widely known about as the other three table saw types that we’ve discussed, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it won’t be the perfect option to suit what you’re looking for. Hybrid table saws are a type of table saw designed to plug the pretty large gap in terms of power and price between the aforementioned contractor table saw and traditional cabinet table saws.

Todd Fratzel   is the Editor of Tool Box Buzz and the President of Front Steps Media, LLC, a web based media company focused on the Home Improvement and Construction Industry.He is also the Principal Engineer for United Construction Corp., located in Newport, NH. In his capacity at United he oversees the Residential and Commercial Building Division along with all Design-Build projects.He is also the editor of Home Construction & Improvement.

Ridgid’s fence is outstanding for its design. Its large front plate helps stabilize it and the whole thing just feels solid. There’s very little play compared to some of the others and we were consistently able to lock it down perfectly square. We like the pinion style bevel adjustment. It’s not quite a good as a separate adjustment wheel, but a great improvement over simple sliding. We also like the independent locks for both height and bevel. It’s not often that a height lock would be required, but there’s an element of confidence that comes from knowing it won’t be going anywhere.
The table measures up at 29 inches by 21.5 inches. The 4100-09 is not suitable for dealing with large stock or sheets of wood. Made from aluminum, you’ll meet with no resistance as you slide the timber toward the blade. The only negative with the table is the way it’s finished with an anodized coating. This is fine to start with but tends to wear over time, something that doesn’t just look unsightly but can ultimately affect accuracy. This is a surprising oversight from Bosch and one we hope they rectify in future iterations of this fine table saw.

This blade shares many features that come standard on other Diablo blades. The carbide teeth are cut from Diablo’s TiCo High Density Carbide. Perma-Shield non-stick coating helps the blade move through material with less friction, reducing heat that can lead to warping in addition to corrosion. Diablo’s Tri-Metal Shock brazing process ensures the teeth stay in place much longer than other blades and can withstand impacts that leave other blades in need of a dentist.
DeWALT DWE7480 is an excellent table saw, especially if you consider its price. It’s a step up from the highly popular DW745 and slightly more expensive, but I think the larger rip capacity and higher RPM are well worth the extra money. The DWE7480 is still in the lower price region though, and unlike the DW745 you can also get this one with a stand: the DWE7480XA!
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