What if a contractor uses their job site saw for high quality built-ins or high tolerance finished cuts? In that case, saw accuracy is critical for that work. In this use case, if the saw is immediately put into use, success depends upon the out-of-the-box accuracy from the manufacturer. The quality of the cuts and more importantly the potential safety of the operator is going to be a function of the as-shipped accuracy of the saw from the manufacturer.
Other than that, this is a great portable saw. It is lightweight and easily moved from location to location. It also has a pro guarding system that basically allows quick and easy adjustments. It also has a metal roll cage to help with durability. Furthermore, it has built in storage which is always welcome. That is a lot of features at this price point!

Measuring 30.31" x 17.32" x 41.81", this powerhouse boasts a heavy duty 10" blade that can cut up to 4" x 4" of material in a single pass. For the handyman who likes to keep all of his tools within arm’s length, RIDGID’s table saw comes with convenient onboard storage so swapping out blades or accessing your tools is just a short reach away. Buyers are crazy for this table saw, and they report that it easily fits into the corner of their garages. Plus, quick and easy assembly means you can get to work straight out the gate.

The first step to take when using a table saw is to don all the appropriate safety gear that a responsible operator should use. This includes, at the bare minimum, eye protection and thick work gloves. It's also a good idea to protect your ears with ear muffs or earplugs and to consider a mask that will cover your mouth and nose to prevent the inhalation of fine saw dust particles.

The SKILSAW SPT70WT-01 is one of the most efficient circulars saw on the market. It has everything you need. It is quality, durable and has a great price. It comes with a 15 amp dual-field motor that delivers 5300 rpm and 25 inches rip cutting capacity on the table top. The maximum depth of cut at 90 degrees is 3-1/2 inches while at 45 degrees is 2-1/4 inches. The SPT70WT-01 measures 19.9 x 23.4 x 13.4 inches and weighs 49 lbs.. It is a lightweight unit that comes with a compact design. Its lightweight feature makes it portable and easy to transport from a place to another. Thanks to its 10 in. 24 tooth carbide rip cutting blade, this SKILSAW model has the ability to rip any type of wood. As compared to other similar units, this one comes with a plethora of useful accessories, such as rip fence, table insert, barrier guard assembly, miter gauge, push stick, anti-kickback device, blade wrench, hex wrench and manual.


Outfeed capacity is almost always the depth of the table. Pros using a jobsite table saw can opt to put a sawhorse or other support to hold the material after it passes the blade. There are a few models running around that give you some extra outfeed support, though. Most of the time, you’ll just have a buddy help guide the cut through from a safe stance on the behind the saw.


The more table size you have, the more support you have which is always a plus, not only for convenience but safety too. There are right side extensions that can be purchased for table saws that increase the table saw’s capacity to get to the center of a 4 x 8 sheet of wood. Although most saws have a rear band that supports the wood as it exits the saw, an additional safety measure is to rig up an outfeed support of some kind in addition to this rear bar. Be sure that the outfeed support you set up is ¼” lower than the table saw is.
I am looking to upgrade from my first table saw which is the Ryobi that you reviewed (had to find something cheap that was decent). I do a lot of rip cuts, as well as fine precision cuts for laminating and joinery required for frames, furniture, etc. I am looking at the Skilsaw and the Dewalt 7480 and cannot decide which would be best for me. Any insight would be helpful!
If you’re looking to squeeze the most possible power out of your table in terms of both strength and precision, it’s a cabinet table saw that you’re looking for. They’re what’s seen as a traditional table saw and the variety that most professional wood cutters use on a day to day basis. However, as the name suggests, this raw power and precision comes at the cost of portability. It’s pretty clear that cabinet table saws are designed to sit in one place and be used as a tool within a workshop environment.
The thing you might not like about it is the non-flat table top. Many people find this downside as quite a burden, especially if you’re processing perfectly flat wood. Also, the protective coating on the top side of this model is pretty subpar. In fact, it barely protects anything. Consequently, it will peel off quite quickly. As far as the price goes, it’s okay, but it could have been a bit cheaper.
One of the biggest issues and potential hazards when working with table saws is kickback. Table saw kickback occurs when wood is ejected from the saw at extremely high speed. You can imagine the sort of injuries this can cause. Table splitters are effectively small vertical bits of metal or sometimes plastic that are designed to stop the wood flying back if there is a kickback.  Attached to the splitter are anti kickback pawls either side, they look like table saw blades themselves but they are in fact there to grip the wood at stick into it in case of kickback.
Another saw that earns good marks from both professionals and users is the DeWalt DWE7491RS (Est. $500). Todd Fratzel of ToolBoxBuzz.com, who says he's normally a "huge fan" of Bosch table saws, nonetheless declares this DeWalt "the best overall job site + mobile stand option out there." He praises the power and accuracy of the table saw, adding that it had no trouble dealing with various materials he tested (3/4-inch plywood, 2x framing material, and 1x maple lumber). He also notes that its rip capacity of 32-1/2 inches is bigger than any other portable saw's – a full 7-1/2 inches bigger than the Bosch 4100-09's. Fratzel loves the wheeled mobile stand, which makes it easy for one person to move this fairly heavy saw (roughly 90 pounds). He says the stand is very easy to set up and allows for the saw to be stored on end, taking up less space.
The bench table saw is the least expensive of the four types of saws. Some models come with a folding stand that is on wheels which makes it very easy to move or reposition without having to lift it all the time. Even though it is relatively light, constant lifting can become tiresome. You can mount these on your workbench which will give it more stability and could possibly reduce the amount of vibration as well. These smaller table saws generally have a 1 hp motor or even smaller and can run on a normal household circuit with no issues.

Scott – I’m assuming you’re talking about the “flatness” of the table and not leveling the saw correct? I will tell you that all jobsite table saws use light weight tables that are NOT machined cast iron like shop saws. Most of the jobsite saws are a light weight cast aluminum top, and NOT machined flat. So there are tolerances in the manufacturing that make it impossible to get a really flat surface. The thing is, in my opinion, for this type of saw it’s not really important. Job site saws are set up for ripping framing lumber, trim, and details that are not as precise as “woodworking” projects. If you need a cut that precise on a job then there are other better approaches including track saws and even pre-cutting materials in the shop. The DEWALT is very similar to the other saws with regard to the table.

DeWALT DWE7480 is an excellent table saw, especially if you consider its price. It’s a step up from the highly popular DW745 and slightly more expensive, but I think the larger rip capacity and higher RPM are well worth the extra money. The DWE7480 is still in the lower price region though, and unlike the DW745 you can also get this one with a stand: the DWE7480XA!
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