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Skilsaw produced the only worm drive table saw in our group and we had high expectations, especially given the high RPM count. In the end, the power is definitely at the professional level and settled in tied for fourth overall with DeWalt. This was the lightest, most compact saw in the group. Like DeWalt, the lack of an outer housing leads to more efficient cooling but drops storage for an extra blade.
It runs off of a powerful 15 amp motor that enables it to attain speeds of up to 3,850 rpm and has a 20 inch rip capacity. It also has a handy dust storage port to help it stay more productive and efficient by keeping the space clean. You’ll enjoy working with this remarkable tool if you’re constantly on the move and will be able to use it for many years to come thanks to its sturdy design.
The first measurements we looked at with the performance testing was blade speed cutting all three of the test materials. This tests gives us a relative comparison of how much blade speed reduction the motors have under different loading conditions. In our opinion this gives us an idea of how strong the motor/gear box combination is for each saw. For each test we also recorded the “no-load” speed to capture the relative drop in rpm in the blade speed while cutting wood. We used our as-measured no-load speeds instead of the published values from the manufacturers.

After reviewing several models we can truly say that metal components are more durable than plastic. Cast iron, for example, is a durable material that provides the most stable surface. It is capable of minimizing vibration and is much heavier than steel or aluminum. Every quality model has a smooth surface and sturdy legs that ensure stability. In what regards the motor and its components, you probably know that it’s quite difficult to check them by looking. However, any product should have a warranty and for a quality product, the manufacturer should offer at least a 3-year warranty.
Todd – Yes I was referring to the “flatness” which some reviewers were complaining about. Thank you for your response. My problem is that I don’t have any workspace in my garage. It is a tiny garage which we use for storage so I need a saw I can store there but will be doing the actual cutting in the driveway so I have to move it out there to cut, then store it back in the garage in a tight space. I thought maybe a job site saw like one of these would work well but I would be making furniture and “woodworking” projects so maybe not. thanks for your feedback.

We don’t always post the point totals when we do a shootout like this because it gets complicated – you have to decide what the important features and performance categories are, determine how much weight each one should hold, and then actually hash out the scores with the team. That said, some of these table saws scored so close to each other that I didn’t feel it was fair to just leave it up to the rankings.
One of the first and most important things to consider is what type of table saw you require. When considering the type make sure you consider things like, where will be using the saw, will it need to be portable and move from job to job or can it be stationary like in a work shop. Also, what will be the largest size bits of timber I will be cutting, what sort of power will I require and budget, below we’ve listed the main types so we hope it helps you find the right type for you.
Above are the results for RPM Blade Speed while cutting 3/4″ plywood. In the left column is the no-load blade speed and the right column is the lowest recorded blade speed during the cut. The drop in blade speed is fairly small ranging from 6% for Hitachi and Ridgid, 7% for Makita and SawStop, 9% Bosch, 11% DEWALT, 14% SkilSaw, and 24% for the Delta.
Both saws accomplish the same thing, but with different results. SawStop’s feature takes about 90 seconds to recover from compared to roughly 1 minute with Bosch. Bosch developed the REAXX to drop the blade without damage while SawStop usually results in a damaged blade that needs to be replaced. The SawStop employs a brake that must be changed after activation at a cost of $69 each. Bosch uses a dual airbag style cartridge. These run $99 each, but you get two shots out of each one.
DeWALT DWE7480 is an excellent table saw, especially if you consider its price. It’s a step up from the highly popular DW745 and slightly more expensive, but I think the larger rip capacity and higher RPM are well worth the extra money. The DWE7480 is still in the lower price region though, and unlike the DW745 you can also get this one with a stand: the DWE7480XA!
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