One term you may hear when reading about table saw accuracy is blade runout. Runout is a term that describes whether or how much the outside edge of a saw blade wobbles while being held by the motor shaft. Sometimes, operators measure runout by using a saw blade. In that case, the very use of a saw blade presumes that the specific blade is perfect or nearly perfect in its flatness. Using a saw blade that has any warping will not give a clear indication of blade runout.
Powermatic is a name that you’ll see a few times on our list of the cabinet saws because this company is responsible so many great models like this 1792010K PM2000, 5HP 1PH Table Saw, with 50-Inch Accu-Fence System. The built-in caster system makes it easy to move the cabinet saw anywhere around your shop with minimal eft, and it comes with a quick release riving knife that reduces vibrations to prevent accidents. At 39-inches high, it also lets you use the saw without stopping over.
Consequently, they’re going to be a bit heavier than benchtop models. However, their expanding frames mean that you’ll be able to use them even in places where you don’t have access to a table or bench. This is great for construction work, or situations where you’re going to be working outside. This type tends to be a little bit bigger than the benchtop variety, and often has more rip capacity as well.

We compiled this set of data and created a ranked set of results by assigning a 1-2-3 rating to the relative values of the test measurements. Then we ranked the saws for overall as-manufactured table flatness. As a point of interest, a typical sheet of copy paper is approximately .004 inches thick. Flatness measurements varied from 0.0 to .09 inches.
With that in mind, you can likely imagine that hybrid table saws are perfect for those looking for greater power than that offered by a contractor table saw, but don’t fancy paying anything around the price of a cabinet table saw. At the same time, whilst hybrid table saws are nowhere near as portable as some of the aforementioned options, you should still be able to find that they can be transported when necessary. When it comes to the middleman of table saws, that’s a title truly deserved by the hybrid variety. In all, if you’re looking for a bit more power than that offered by a contractor table saw but don’t fancy paying the price of a cabinet variety, this is an option well worth your looking at.
All seven saws in the best table saw testing have some kind of dust control. The Rockwell saw has a completely enclosed motor compartment with a large dust bag that attaches under the saw to catch sawdust. The remaining saws have a shroud around the blade and a 2-1/2-in. port on the back for attaching either a bag or a vacuum cleaner. None were perfect, but at least you can catch most of the sawdust. The Craftsman and Ryobi also include a dust bag that attaches to the vacuum cleaner port.
I knew there were jobsite table saws on the market for less than $250, but I never thought they were good enough to get my recommendation. Sure, the SKIL 3410-02 is not a professional saw and may not be versatile enough for contractors, but the stand, power, accuracy and build quality of this table saw are much better than I thought possible in this class.
Easy Fence Adjustment – One of the most common uses of the average table saw is to make quick adjustments to wooden items like fences. If you’re planning on using this particular table saw to make such adjustments to your fencing, you’ll be pleased to hear that the rack and pinion fence rails of the DEWALT DW745 allow for quick and easy adjustment of just about any wooden fence. In all, it goes without saying that you’re going to want your table saw to be as quick and effective as possible in what it does and we can comfortably say that this product meets that spec here.

The DEWALT DWE7480 Compact Job-Site Table Saw is obviously a very impressive tool and in our opinion, it’s the best on the market. That’s why we’ve chosen it as our top pick. The design is built with the contractor in mind and helps to ensure that you’ll never have to worry about the machine breaking down on you in the middle of a job or not being able to meet your demands. The saw is fairly light weight (coming in at only 53 pounds) and is powered by an impressive 15 amp motor that has a 20 inch rip capacity.

Dust collection can seem like an afterthought for jobsite table saws. The fact that you’re outside, often on an unoccupied site, negates the need to collect your dust. But breathing that stuff doesn’t do your lungs any favors. That’s why dust collection is so important. Of course, if you’re working inside or in an occupied structure, collecting all that dust will make the cleanup part of your day easier to deal with. Since we’re not talking about concrete dust regulations, even a standard shop vac will be a good bet to help contain the mess.
The blades are categorized according to number of teeth, diameter, arbor size, kerf size, application and speed. They can also be divided by material. Regular commercial table saws are 10-inch or 12-inch. Teeth usually number from 24-80. Many blades are tipped with diamond, carbon or carbide. This lets you cut through more than just wood. You will also need to think about the tilt of the blade. They are available in left tilt or right tilt. With a left-tilting hybrid or cabinet saw, the motor cover can get in the way of the sliding table. Router table extensions don’t work well on left-tilting saws. 
We put our hands on 10 of the most popular table saws and tested them for accuracy, power, and functionality. It took some time, but we have some fairly conclusive results. Table saws are undeniably the kings of rip cuts on the jobsite and in shops. The concept is simple: Place a motor below a solid table to turn a blade somewhere in the 4000-5000 RPM range through the surface and watch the sawdust fly. The idea may be simple, but the reality is much different. How big should the table be? What size blade should you use? How heavy can you get away with making it? For this shootout, we’re looking specifically to find the best portable jobsite table saw.
It is safe to say that we live in a DIY era. Think about it. When was the last time you went on YouTube or anywhere else online and looked for something that tickled your fancy, a guide on how something is made or done, or maybe a tutorial. Indeed, we do it very often, so why should woodworking and home improvement be any different? With the prices of table saws constantly dipping and the insane number of choices on the market, you can get one for yourself and save thousands of dollars by doing things yourself instead of hiring contractors.
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