Brad – Won’t be anytime soon. I’d offer a few thoughts though on this topic. First off, for this type of testing it’s just not feasible for us to do any long term testing that would be required to evaluate your concern. You’re right, most jobsite table saws have less than perfect fence systems. The rack-and-pinion style that DEWALT, Hitachi and some others use are far more accurate over the long haul than the “clamp” style. Lastly, for lots of guys they are transitioning to track saws for work that requires a really precise cuts or they cut critical pieces in the shop. In a perfect world we’d get shop precision out of jobsite saws, but the reality is due to weight limits its unlikely. Thanks for the feedback.


1. Is it possible that the SkilSaw SPT99-11 and SPT99-12 have the ability to accept up to a 13/16″ dado set instead of just the 1/2″ max your review states? I have seen the larger spec stated elsewhere. If not, why? Is the arbor just not long enough? Or is it a zero clearance plate problem? I can’t imagine having to do two passes to complete a 3/4″ dado. The 1/2″ max seems a weird anomaly as compared to all other saws in the class.
Jeffery – As Rob explained things we had the RPM measurements running on that meter, and had to watch our video playback to evaluate the numbers (no recording of the numbers digitally). So we tried to take the average no load speed watching the video play back. Is it perfect? No….is a 10% difference a big deal? In this application I doubt it. If we were a full blown testing lab we’d have the data recorded digitally and take full blow averages, but alas we are not.
Let’s face it: guys get in each other's’ way at a job site. It’s not always easy to find room to work, so portability is a serious advantage when it comes to making the most out of your space. Luckily for the professionals out there — not to mention hobbyists who prefer to move around rather than work in the same spot everyday — RIDGID’s 15-amp table saw comes with a convenient mobile cart for stress-free transportation.
One of the first and most important things to consider is what type of table saw you require. When considering the type make sure you consider things like, where will be using the saw, will it need to be portable and move from job to job or can it be stationary like in a work shop. Also, what will be the largest size bits of timber I will be cutting, what sort of power will I require and budget, below we’ve listed the main types so we hope it helps you find the right type for you.
Furthermore, the split guard offers a tool-free riving knife that moves freely via a front level control for on-the-fly adjustment. Pawls and splitter guards can also be added to the riving knife without the need for tools as well. Best of all, the 36-L352 includes a 52-inch Biesemeyer Fence System that has an integrated tape and a hairline pointer for consistent and repeatable cuts every time. If you don’t work with wood that needs the additional horsepower of 36-L552, this version of the Delta UniSaw is definitely for you.
Safety Features: All said and done, you have to accept that the portable table saws are amongst the more dangerous tools to operate. If you are not careful, you can easily get hurt. This makes the safety features some of the most important to consider. I would keep an eye out for features like anti-kickback pawls and blade tilt as they go a long way in avoiding accidents. Most also come with a magnetic switch that makes sure that the machine does not get started on its own accidentally. This is essential. Do not buy a portable table saw without a magnetic switch.
We put our hands on 10 of the most popular table saws and tested them for accuracy, power, and functionality. It took some time, but we have some fairly conclusive results. Table saws are undeniably the kings of rip cuts on the jobsite and in shops. The concept is simple: Place a motor below a solid table to turn a blade somewhere in the 4000-5000 RPM range through the surface and watch the sawdust fly. The idea may be simple, but the reality is much different. How big should the table be? What size blade should you use? How heavy can you get away with making it? For this shootout, we’re looking specifically to find the best portable jobsite table saw.
However, with proper use, table saws are generally safe tools, advanced blade stopping technology not needed. Therefore considering a saw without such safety features is fine for the cautious DIY user or for the professional carpenter and/or builder. Take into careful account the actual table size of the table saw you are considering. If you are going to be completing rip cuts in large sheets of plywood, then you need a saw with a table large enough to support these big pieces of lumber.
When it comes to both appliances and power tools, Bosch is one of the most recognized brands out there. It is equipped with a 15-amp electric motor which has 3650 rpm. Moreover, the diameter of its blade is 10 inches, while the rip capacity is about 25 inches. As compared to other similar units, the Bosch 4100-09 comes with a plethora of safety features, including an arbor lock mechanism which helps you change the blade with ease. In what regards the design of this unit, it’s important to know that it is pretty compact. It measures 39.13 x 30 x 20.9 inches and weighs no more than 60 pounds. Also, keep in mind that the distance between the work surface and the floor is only 37.5 inches. Thanks to the unique properties of the carbide material, the unit is considered to be one of the most durable tools on the market. It is able to cut through pine and plywood which are the softer types of wood out there. Considering its impressive features and powerful motor, the Bosch 4100-09 will certainly be a welcome addition to any workshop.
Portable table saws are made to easily transport, making them a perfect utility saw for carpenters. Portable saws function exactly the way a big table saw works. The difference is the portable table saw does not have the huge motor as the types of saws. Because they use the smaller motor, they are not as powerful and are also loud. They are less durable and are not as stable as the larger saws. One good suggestion for a portable table saw is the Ryobi Table Saw.

First up is the portable table saw. There are two variations in this category, the first of which is the benchtop. As the name implies, the benchtop table saw is designed to be used on top of a table or bench. They’re small, so that it doesn’t matter which table or bench you put them on, and they’re light enough to be carried from place-to-place. This type of saw was originally meant for construction, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t get good use out of it in your shop or garage.
Dewalt designed an excellent table saw when they created the DW745 and we consider it to be the best buy on the market from our review. The design is fairly lightweight and easy to transport as it only weighs about 45 pounds. Additionally, the device is full of great features that enable it to work with speed and efficiency that you typically don’t see in a portable saw.

One shouldn’t expect a massive amount of storage, but being a table, it does offer some level of free space. In fact, some models even offer space for fences, gauges, blades, and other necessary equipment. Apart from that, you can always keep the necessary tools in the reach of your hands. It will make the process much easier and also a lot quicker.

A magnetic switch is also good from a safety standpoint but may not be necessary on these smaller versions. A magnetic switch prevents the saw from starting back up if it loses power during a power outage. Basically, the power outage will turn off the saw. This is good because if for some reason the power were to come back on when you were not near the machine, the material could be shot out of it or damage the saw.

Innovative Gravity Rise Sand – When it comes to the features of Bosch’s 4100-09 table saw, there’s clearly only one place to start and that’s with the Gravity Rise Stand that comes as part of the package here. This is basically a stand that can be intelligently adjusted to your liking and then wheeled away when you’re finished using the table saw. It’s a pretty innovative idea from Bosch and definitely one of the best stands that we’ve seen included with any table saw that we’ve reviewed or on the market.
This “review” is a giant nothingBurger. There is not one scrap of objective comparison between these saws. Because you sell them, they’re all great and will all zip right through “the hardest woods”. Bulll$hit. You did not test, compare, analyze, or use ANY of these saws. Re-hashinf manufacturer specs is a “Roundup” but it certainly is not a review. Typical sales pablum.
I decided to do the very same thing a while back. I thought it would take a few days to figure out everything about table saws and then just buy one. I was dead wrong. While table saws are simple in their construction, they are complex because there are so many factors, so many aspects, and so many different features to consider. After spending a large amount of time doing my homework, I decided to share what I learned with you, in the shape of table saw reviews and informational articles. Before you actually go and read them, let me take you on a quick walk through the website so you know what there is and where you can find it.
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