The CNS175-TGP36 SawStop is a 10 in. contractor table saw with a 45-degree bevel and a rip capacity of 36.5 in. Other than that, we think this is a pretty cool table saw for a few different reasons. First, the price is about half of all other SawStop table saws, and we know money talks (actually, it yells)! Second, like all other SawStop table saws, it has the integrated flesh sensing technology, so you can be sure you’re going to keep all your digits. Also, it has some pretty impressive power; it’s powered by 15 A motor so you’ll be able to tackle whatever you need. The last of our favorite features is its portability. For being a contractor saw, it’s pretty easy to pack up and move around.
Their 15-amp, 120-volt motors cut with greater ease than a circ saw, although they can bog down if fed thick hardwood too quickly. The cabinets are typically plastic, with cast-aluminum tops and extruded-aluminum fences. In these models, the motors are supported by trunnions mounted to the underside of the table. The resulting vibration reduces accuracy. These trunnions are usually made of lightweight steel or aluminum, which are susceptible to wear. And because these saws are small, cutting full-size sheets of plywood or MDF isn't a good idea unless the sheet is supported by a table extension.
It is an extremely durable and sturdy product. However, there are some drawbacks. First of all, it is expensive without quite backing up that price in all areas. It does not really have the elite safety feature of our top choice, and it also lacks high-end power. These are minor points (it is still safe and powerful), but you expect it to be perfect at this price.

How big a table saw is, is determined by the largest blade the saw will hold. 8” blades are the smallest that should be used for any home workshop. You can get blades in 9”, 10”, and 12” sizes as well. Most workshops will not really need the 12” blade as this has a very deep cut capability, but for construction firms and larger, commercial shops, the 12” comes in handy.
Some table saws go one better than a splitter. Splitters are fixed. They do not move along with the blade. It also needs to be removed if you’re making cross-cuts or dado cuts. A riving knife, on the other hand, is fixed to the same part as the blade. This means it can move along with the blade. Riving knives don’t get in the way either so this is the best option.
Cabinet saws are the prime choice for professional woodworkers. A more powerful induction motor, usually 3 to 5 HP, is enclosed in a cabinet, as part of a super-sturdy overall construction. This type of table saw is ideal for making smooth, straight cuts through hardwoods without worrying about excessive vibration. All that power and stability comes at a price, though. Low-end cabinet saws start around $2,300 and can go past $5,000 for industrial table saws.
For this portion of the testing and evaluation we used three different materials (3/4″ AC Plywood, 5/4 Mahogany Decking, and 5/4 Pressure Treated Southern Yellow Pine Decking) while measuring the saw blade RPM, and the saw motor AMP draw. To compare the saws we’re looking for how much blade speed each saw has under load, and also how much the amp draw increases under load. Think about it like driving a car, a more powerful car will not drop as much speed going up a hill and the engine won’t work as hard.
If you’ve purchased a power tool in the past, Dewalt are a name that you’ve likely already heard of and that’s no surprise considering the standard of their products. They’ve been designing and manufacturing some of the world’s best power tools for well over 90 years, so you can likely imagine that you’re going to be in safe hands buying a table saw of any kind from Dewalt. It is worth mentioning though that Dewalt’s products are largely targeted at professional contractors and those within the building industry. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t find a product in their range that’s suited to your needs.
For homeowners without the luxury of a huge garage to fit their enormous table saw, DEWALT’s DWE7480 is a compact alternative to bulkier machines with the same wood slicing power. Measuring 25.8" x 26.5" x 13.9", the DWE7480 hosts a 15-amp motor that cuts at an unbelievable 4800 rpm with a ten-inch blade, meaning this small package packs big performance — and with adjustable rear feet that are designed to allow users to level their table saw on uneven surfaces, you’ll be sure to get a clean, precise cut every time, no matter how rugged the terrain. An additional dust port makes collecting your sawdust a breeze — especially if you attach an optional shop vac extension.
The DEWALT DWE7480 Compact Job-Site Table Saw is obviously a very impressive tool and in our opinion, it’s the best on the market. That’s why we’ve chosen it as our top pick. The design is built with the contractor in mind and helps to ensure that you’ll never have to worry about the machine breaking down on you in the middle of a job or not being able to meet your demands. The saw is fairly light weight (coming in at only 53 pounds) and is powered by an impressive 15 amp motor that has a 20 inch rip capacity.
Measuring in at 19.9" x 23.4" x 13.4", the SPT70WT-01 is compact enough to fit into any aspiring handyman’s garage, but powerful enough to tackle anything you throw at it on the job site, meaning it’s an ideal entry-level table saw for the amateur hoping to turn his hobby into a career. Sturdiness, durability, and anti-kickback technology make the world’s first worm drive table saw a revolutionary machine. Satisfied buyers can’t get enough of this balanced wood-devouring behemoth.
Patrick – Thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I wish we could spend more time on every aspect but we spent hundreds of hours as it was. I can tell you that the rack and pinion fences are much better than the standard fences of the past. Our entire group felt strongly that we’d prefer the rack and pinion on all the saws. We felt the Ridgid and Delta fences were the least impressive of the standard type.
Some of the key table saw brands included Dewalt, Bosch, Makita and Ryobi. You’ll notice that we’ve featured a number of these brands across our table saw reviews. You’ll also find that these different brands offer something very different in terms of their features and functionality. With that in mind, we’ve put together a comprehensive summary of those brands on this very page and you’ll find more detailed information about them across the website and also information about choosing the best brand of table saw for you.
The best portable table saw is going to depend largely on what you need the saw for, however, there are three main types of portable table saws; bench top, compact, and job site table saws. These machines vary in their capabilities, but they are all easy to maneuver and move around compared to their stationary counterparts. If you only need a small saw that will be good for your DIY projects, you can likely get by with just a benchtop table saw.

We’ve approaching the end of the table saw reviews on this page and we’ve selected the GTS1031 10-Inch Portable Jobsite Table Saw from Bosch to conclude those reviews. Our reasoning behind choosing this particular saw is largely because it offers a good all round selection of functionality. As you’ll find over the course of this review, this is a table saw that provides portability, flexibility, power and more. It may not excel in all of those areas but if you’re stuck for choice when it comes to a table saw, this’ll get the job done.
The fence on a table saw is one of its defining features and allows for precise, square, and repeatable cuts. Not all fences are equal though and a poorly built fence is a deal-breaker, in my opinion. Not only will a poorly built and implemented fence affect the quality of your cuts, but a fence that moves or is not square to the blade can cause your material to bind and kickback.
We hear the term accuracy tossed around when it comes to finding the best portable jobsite table saw, but we really have to narrow down what that means. Every saw we tested has the capability of being calibrated and it should be the first thing you do after setting it up. Like a new miter saw, blade calibration is simply part of delivering professional results.

The bench table saw is the least expensive of the four types of saws. Some models come with a folding stand that is on wheels which makes it very easy to move or reposition without having to lift it all the time. Even though it is relatively light, constant lifting can become tiresome. You can mount these on your workbench which will give it more stability and could possibly reduce the amount of vibration as well. These smaller table saws generally have a 1 hp motor or even smaller and can run on a normal household circuit with no issues.
Replacing the hugely popular outgoing W1824, the W1851 is a brand-new Shop Fox hybrid with the same enclosed cabinet as you’ll find on the W1819 alongside features more in line with a contractor’s saw. We chose to review the W1851 as it’s a more flexible option than the W1819 and appeals to a broader range of woodworkers. We rarely review brand new products but in this case we made an exception… With a brand like Shop Fox, it’s not a case of taking a chance but of betting on a winning team.
It is safe to say that we live in a DIY era. Think about it. When was the last time you went on YouTube or anywhere else online and looked for something that tickled your fancy, a guide on how something is made or done, or maybe a tutorial. Indeed, we do it very often, so why should woodworking and home improvement be any different? With the prices of table saws constantly dipping and the insane number of choices on the market, you can get one for yourself and save thousands of dollars by doing things yourself instead of hiring contractors.
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