If you’re looking to squeeze the most possible power out of your table in terms of both strength and precision, it’s a cabinet table saw that you’re looking for. They’re what’s seen as a traditional table saw and the variety that most professional wood cutters use on a day to day basis. However, as the name suggests, this raw power and precision comes at the cost of portability. It’s pretty clear that cabinet table saws are designed to sit in one place and be used as a tool within a workshop environment.
At this point, you are wondering why this is not number 1. The problem is with all that power, precision, and all those great features; you can get only 18 inches of cut from it. This severely impacts the usability of the product. While it can still be used for some home based products, its use in a professional setup is fairly limited to smaller projects. It also only has a one year warranty which is pretty light.
The integrated blade carries an electrical signal. Once it comes in contact with human skin, the signal changes because of the skin’s conductivity and the blade immediately stop. Although some people don’t like the process of resetting the blade, it’s quite easy, and it takes only a couple of minutes. If you think about it, it’s better to hassle by resetting the blade for five or six minutes instead of losing a few fingers.
Ridgid notches a third place finish as the only saw to include an independent blade height lock. The adjustment wheel raises and lowers with multiple full turns like most saws, but integrates a lock into the center. For the bevel adjustment, the outside of the height adjustment wheel turns a rack and pinion style system to accurately change the blade angle – a feature Makita shares.
Durable Steel Design – With this being such a portable product from Bosch, you’d be forgiven for thinking that it’s pretty flimsy when it comes to design. However, that couldn’t be further from the case with the Bosch GTS1031’s durable and unique all-steel base. This is a design that’s clearly built to take on abuse. That’s definitely peace of mind that you’ll want to have when it comes to using this table saw in a working environment. Not that you shouldn’t be careful where possible when it comes to using your new table saw.
As you probably might think a quality model must have some safety feature. This is not a toy; this is a powerful tool which can cause serious injury. That’s why, safety features like splitters, anti-kickback or riving knives are there to minimize these risks. When you have your fingers inches away from the blades that spin with a power hard to imagine, you need to be very careful. Therefore, safety features like the ones above will help you keep your hand intact.
The DeWalt DWE7499GD table saw earns a third place finish in the safety category thanks to their GuardDetect technology. This doesn’t prevent you from using the saw without the pawls and blade guard in place, but it does require you to physically indicate you are aware they’re not in place. Ideally, this gives your mind one last opportunity to consciously note the additional care that needs to take place before cutting.
The bench table saw is the least expensive of the four types of saws. Some models come with a folding stand that is on wheels which makes it very easy to move or reposition without having to lift it all the time. Even though it is relatively light, constant lifting can become tiresome. You can mount these on your workbench which will give it more stability and could possibly reduce the amount of vibration as well. These smaller table saws generally have a 1 hp motor or even smaller and can run on a normal household circuit with no issues.
This is the smallest of all the table saws, typically weighing about 50 pounds or so and designed to sit on top of a table or workbench. Bench style table saws are usually made of steel, plastic and aluminum. They are good for light to medium duty cutting and would not be a good choice if you do a lot of cutting or if you have a professional business. Because it can be lifted by one person and moved around with relative ease, this type of saw is often called a portable table saw. Due to the size of these saws which measure approximately 19” x 27”, they are not designed to rip large pieces of wood. It is also not easy to make mitered cuts. You will notice that there might be more vibration when using this saw as compared to other, larger models. This is due to the lighter weight of the saw. Unfortunately, the vibration can affect the accuracy of the cuts you’re making.
These models tend to be much heavier than portable models, clocking in at 200+ pounds in many circumstances, which mean you may need another person in order to move them safely. The big upside to this model is that that additional weight goes to good use. They tend to have much larger rip capacities, and the table top tends to be more durable and stable than the expanding systems used in portable models.

It’s worth remembering that contractor table saws are still going to be pretty portable because they’re designed to be used by contractors. That being said, unlike portable table saws, they don’t necessarily fold up into a compact position. This is largely because contractors tend to have the facilities needed in order to transport a larger bit of kit. The extra space that they take up in comparison to a portable table saw means that contractor table saws are able to offer a greater level of power and precision. Both of these points further support the fact that contractor table saws sit in the middle ground.
Jeffery – As Rob explained things we had the RPM measurements running on that meter, and had to watch our video playback to evaluate the numbers (no recording of the numbers digitally). So we tried to take the average no load speed watching the video play back. Is it perfect? No….is a 10% difference a big deal? In this application I doubt it. If we were a full blown testing lab we’d have the data recorded digitally and take full blow averages, but alas we are not.
Often called benchtop, jobsite, or worksite saws, portable table saws are typically made of lightweight materials, such as an aluminum table top, so that they’re easy to move from place to place. Sometimes they’ll have wheels attached to make shifting them around even easier. The motors on portable saws are also much smaller than on other types of table saws, and are typically less powerful.
If the aforementioned portable table saw is largely targeted at homeowners and those simply looking to complete the odd job, we’d definitely argue that a contractor table saw is aimed at well, contractors who need to transport their saw. You’ll find that a contractor table saw does offer some degree of portability, whilst still managing to maintain some of a complete table saw. With that in mind, some users describe this as the perfect sweet spot when it comes to table saws, offering a nice combination between power and portability.
A little unusual for Bosch’s larger tools, it comes in reasonably light weight at 60 pounds – only Skilsaw and Ryobi posted lighter weights. Like Milwaukee in our 18V impact driver shootout, the Bosch 4100 didn’t really stand out from the crowd in features and performance. It’s solid consistency in every area we tested earned it the top spot in the class.
The biggest thing that is making me watch less and less is the fact that most people will never use half the products you do. Like the Lattice. 99.9% of your viewers will have to use store Lattice as cost is to be considered. I estimate that each piece of Lattice you put on this house costs about $50 finished. Multiply that by 20 sheets and your at a cool $1000 for your Lattice. Most of us would go to the store and purchase 10 Lattice sheets for about $300. 10 sheets as each make up two panels. It would be really nice, for a change, that you would fix up a house the same way most of us would. Probably the reason Ask This Old House has out classed This Old House.
×