High RPM: Rotations per minute are an important consideration when you are looking to buy the ideal portable table saw. It ensures that you can cut the wood/material a lot more efficiently and accurately. It also means that the thickness can be adjusted easily, and you can get a plank to the thickness that you would like. The high RPM also makes sure that the cut is relatively smooth and the rips do not show up in the form of uneven edges. On an average, most table saws have a 15 amps motor. It is the RPM that makes a big difference in performance. Anything above 4500 is fantastic.

Below we’ve included the current pricing (at the time of publishing this article). Pricing includes the cost of the stand and ranges from a low of $349 for the Hitachi to a high of $1,299 for the SawStop. The lowest price isn’t always the best in our opinion, we’re looking for the best value.  The Hitachi is an incredible deal at $349 and our top pick for price and value for a saw that has lots of power, a rack & pinion fence, and a solid stand.


One thing manufactures noticed over the years was that when people used the splitters in normal straight cuts it worked well but it’s biggest downfall came when contractors wanted to do cross cuts. What would happen is that people would remove the splitters to make the cross cuts but then forget to fixed them back in place. One brilliant table saw safety feature is the riving knife. The Riving knife is attached directly to the blade mechanism, this allows it to always be attached not matter where or what angle the blade is.
Our table saw review quickly showed that today’s portable table saws are light-years ahead of the small-saw offerings from a decade ago. They feature big-capacity cutting, greatly improved safety features and attached stands for easy setup. And saws in the upper price range rival stationary saws in accuracy and quality of cut. We limited our review to saws that included a stand with wheels and ones that could rip at least 24 in. wide, only the best table saw for our readers!
So what should you do? The good news is, you don’t need to rely on budget tools to get you through your projects anymore. All you need to do is set aside some time to do some research and investigating so you can find a tool that truly fits your needs. And luckily for you, we’ve taken the time to compile a list of the top 10 best table saws that you can invest in for your woodworking projects.
In addition, a top-quality fence should move smoothly and have a scale that’s accurate and easy to read. Our favorite is the DeWalt fence. The rack-and-pinion system keeps the fence parallel to the blade, and the micro-adjusting knob allows easy and precise fence positioning. Runners-up in this category for best table saw are the Ridgid and Bosch saws. They both have superb fences, with the added advantage of T-slots for attaching accessories like featherboards.
If wood cutting is something that you’re going to be doing every day and you plan on needing a tool that can provide heavy duty results, your best option might be to look up the scale at table saws with a blade size of well over 12 inches. In all though, we’ve found that day to day use with a 12 inch blade is pretty easy and it won’t break the bank either. Just as with the power of the table saw, you’ll need to carefully consider the blade size before picking the right option for you. With so much variation between the products on the market, it’s important to choose the blade size that’s right for you.
If you’re looking for the perfect cabinet table saw out there, then you should look no further than the SawStop ICS51230-52. This is an industrial grade cabinet saw and is also the highest quality, most powerful and heaviest cabinet saw you can currently get. Its fifty two inch industrial T-glide fence assembly, combined with a 5 HP, 230V single phase motor offers safety, versatility, durability and peace of mind that SawStop is so well known for.
Setup was nearly as simple as SawStop’s with just a narrow margin between them. We only needed to attach the handle and bolt the saw down to the stand. The stand is a gravity rise style, but requires you to bend down to ground level for collapsing and extending it. It’s a reasonably solid platform, though a lot of movement throughout the day will leave your back sore.
So what should you do? The good news is, you don’t need to rely on budget tools to get you through your projects anymore. All you need to do is set aside some time to do some research and investigating so you can find a tool that truly fits your needs. And luckily for you, we’ve taken the time to compile a list of the top 10 best table saws that you can invest in for your woodworking projects.
Table saws in this best table saw review run the gamut in price and quality. You can buy a table saw for as little as $150, and if you use it just to occasionally rip a board, that may be all the saw you need. If you want a saw that’s easy to carry and you don’t need to rip sheets of plywood in half, look for a “compact” saw like the DeWalt DW745 (shown) or the Bosch GTS1031. If you have room for a little larger saw that’s slightly less portable but capable of wide rips, consider one of the best table saws we review here. And finally, if you want to build cabinets or furniture and have a big enough work area, you can step up to a stationary contractor’s saw like the Ridgid R4512 (shown), for about $650.
The safety features begin with the professional grade T-Glide Fence. Constructed from heavy gauge steel, this saw fence makes guiding material safe and secure anywhere on the work surface without needing to worry about rolling or slipping. Furthermore, the TGP252 also has an integrated overarm dust collection hood built into the saw guard which eliminates 99% of all sawdust generated by the woodcutting process. Sawdust is classified by the CDC as carcinogenic, so eliminating airborne sawdust from your workspace is essential to promoting your long term health.

However, thanks to the innovative safety technology incorporated into the design, you’ll never have to worry about incurring severe injury. The tool is capable of sensing human touch and will shut down within milliseconds of accidental contact. You’ll be able to work in a safe and clean space with no worries if you invest in the best quality tool like the SawStop table saw.
To get the feel of the cut, we used a two man team to feed from one end of the saw and catch on the other. This helped us reduce the friction that comes from one person trying to hold a board flush against the fence while also keeping downward pressure to keep it level on the table. There was definitely some hesitation at the beginning of each cut that was alleviated once the board was received by the second man on the other side. It was during this middle section that the table/fence friction was at its lowest point and we made our determinations about each saw’s power and cutting speed.
From there, it’s all about flesh detection. The REAXX wins out over SawStop in this category thanks to quicker recovery, a two-shot activation mechanism ($99 per cartridge, $49.50 per shot), and keeping the blade from damage. The initial saws to go out also come with a code to get an extra cartridge for free when you register the REAXX. Like I mentioned earlier, the unknown is still the actual reaction time compared to SawStop.
The best thing about the Bosch 4100-09 is its portability, as it is simple to set up and take down, and easy to move with its large wheels. Even better, it features a slim frame when folded up, which makes it easy to store. It is a portable table saw, but it is able to rip lumber up to 40.5” long, which is about what you’d expect for a stationary model.
The Craftsman table saw is one of the most compact of the bunch when it’s folded up. And if you can get it for the sale price of $260, it’s also the cheapest of the best table saw options. The blade guard and anti-kickback pawls are identical to the Porter-Cable and are the hardest of any of the saws to install. And they are the only two blade guards that don’t have a feature to hold them out of the way when you’re adjusting the blade or setting up the cut.
Inspect your wood carefully to make sure that you are able to maintain a safe working environment and are able to complete high quality work. Now that you’ve got these things in mind there are only a few more things you’ll need to remember before you’re ready to get to work! First, remember that the blade spins towards you, the operator. This means that you’ll always want to feed the wood to the machine by pushing it towards the blade and away from you.
Consequently, they’re going to be a bit heavier than benchtop models. However, their expanding frames mean that you’ll be able to use them even in places where you don’t have access to a table or bench. This is great for construction work, or situations where you’re going to be working outside. This type tends to be a little bit bigger than the benchtop variety, and often has more rip capacity as well.
We really should point out a big deal here and that’s the SawStop. It’s hard to put a price on safety and while the SawStop costs more than 3 times what the Hitachi costs it does offer safety that no other saw in test can offer. For those that can afford the additional cost that feature alone may tip the scales for you. Regardless of price SawStop came in 5th place for the categories we evaluated.
New, unopened in boxTraditional guard and riving knife system allows unlimited capacity for cross and rip cutsLightweight and compact design makes it easy to carry anywhere and sets up in seconds to cut wood, tile, plastic, metal, and aluminum Adjustable Miter Gauge for 0to 60angled cuts, right or leftSafety switch with key prevents accidental startAccessories included 1-miter gauge, 1-rip fenc...
Delta has also improved the tabletop geometry on this model which means that you’re going to get more surface area stabilization. The base is also made of durable cast iron and since it offers easy access to the off/on switch, using the Delta UNISAW is a breeze. Other user friendly features include the convenient dust extraction system, large blade opening for easily changing the blade and fine-tuning the riving knife, smart storage for simple organization and fast access.
Reviewers recommend these models for easy transport to jobsites and for easy storage in a small workshop. Portable table saws come in two types. Benchtop saws sit on top of a workbench and are light enough to pick up and carry; jobsite saws are mounted on folding stands, usually with wheels for easier transport. The main drawbacks of a portable saw are its lower power and smaller table, which makes it tricky to cut larger lumber and sheet material such as plywood. Prices for portable saws start at less than $200, but the best-rated models typically cost $300 or more.
This saw/stand combination is the most expensive of the group. But you get some top-end features. The first thing you’ll notice is the stand with its splayed legs that have no wheels in the setup position. You can’t wheel it around, but man is it sturdy, which is great if you’re ripping sheets of plywood or long, heavy boards. Another unique advantage of this stand is that you can easily remove the saw. That makes the saw easy to transport and to use without the stand. But our favorite feature is the patented rack-and-pinion fence that stays perfectly parallel to the blade and is super easy to adjust. If you can afford to spend a little more, we think the DeWalt is hard to beat.
From the triple belt drive system, to the three-HP motor and the large cast iron table and wings, the Shop Fox W18193 s built like a tank. You’re also going to love the T-slot miter gauge that features a fence extension and flip stop, but also a four inch port for dust collection and camlock T-fence. There’s also a twenty nine and a half inch rip capacity.

The Shop Fox W1819 is our top table saw, due to its phenomenal power and great safety features. The DEWALT DWE7491RS was the best pick under $1000, due to its excellent power and portability. The Bosch 4100-09 was third on our list, featuring electronic speed control and easy blade changes. The DEWALT DW745 was the best for the money, as a smaller version of the DWE7491RS that packs the same amount of power. The Craftsman 21807 was last on our list since it has severe precision issues.
As you would expect, the most expensive saws made slightly smoother cuts. But the difference was negligible. The only saw that struggled to make smooth cuts in the super-thick oak was the Ryobi. In more common situations, like cutting 3/4-in.-thick material, Ryobi’s cut quality was fine. We found the blades included with all the saws to be adequate for most ripping tasks. But if you want cuts smooth enough for glue joints, you’ll have to invest in a better blade.
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