To ensure that our runout measurements were accurate, TBB used a Freud calibration plate. Freud manufactures this ground stainless steel plate to a tolerance of ± .0005 inches in flatness across the plate. While TBB does not have a means to measure the accuracy of this specification, we did put this calibration plate on top of a polished granite calibration table and could not shine a light under any portion of the plate or slip the 0.001 feeler gauge under the edge.
The price is acceptable. One cannot say it’s a cheap piece of equipment because it’s not. But, the high quality of production and a great deal of precision justify the somewhat premium price. If you’re a devoted professional, the price shouldn’t be much of an issue for you. The only downside many people reported is the quality control within the company. Many models came with broken or missing parts.

It’s often overwhelming when looking for new power tools and products online. So many features, specs and brands etc to research and review. So, what should you look for when buying a new table saw? One thing we always mention is to make sure you read as many table saw reviews as you can before purchasing one, this will insure you have the best table saw for your requirements.
The fence on this system is easily the winner. With clamping on just the front side, it self-aligns better than any other in the group and offers excellent stability. While SawStop didn’t have the most powerful feel to the cuts, it was very smooth with little vibration. Feature preferences aside, the only (slight) negative we agreed on was that the bevel lock stuck a little bit compared to others.
The biggest thing that is making me watch less and less is the fact that most people will never use half the products you do. Like the Lattice. 99.9% of your viewers will have to use store Lattice as cost is to be considered. I estimate that each piece of Lattice you put on this house costs about $50 finished. Multiply that by 20 sheets and your at a cool $1000 for your Lattice. Most of us would go to the store and purchase 10 Lattice sheets for about $300. 10 sheets as each make up two panels. It would be really nice, for a change, that you would fix up a house the same way most of us would. Probably the reason Ask This Old House has out classed This Old House.
Other than that, this is a great portable saw. It is lightweight and easily moved from location to location. It also has a pro guarding system that basically allows quick and easy adjustments. It also has a metal roll cage to help with durability. Furthermore, it has built in storage which is always welcome. That is a lot of features at this price point!
The latest advance in table saw safety is a feature that stops the spinning blade when it senses the presence of tissue, such as a finger or forearm. A company called SawStop was the first to offer this technology, and currently, it holds the exclusive right to sell saws with this feature in the United States. (Bosch introduced a portable table saw with blade-stopping technology in 2016, but was forced to take it off the market after a successful patent-infringement suit by SawStop.) In 2017, the CPSC proposed a new rule to make SawStop's technology mandatory on all table saws, but that rule is still under review. See the Buying Guide for more information.

As you can tell, this particular type is in the middle between portable and contractor. Some people can finish their projects with bench top saws, but the ones who can’t usually opt for hybrid saws because they are cheaper than contractor ones. One cannot say they are cheap per se, but it’s a significantly smaller investment in comparison to contractor models.
We put our hands on 10 of the most popular table saws and tested them for accuracy, power, and functionality. It took some time, but we have some fairly conclusive results. Table saws are undeniably the kings of rip cuts on the jobsite and in shops. The concept is simple: Place a motor below a solid table to turn a blade somewhere in the 4000-5000 RPM range through the surface and watch the sawdust fly. The idea may be simple, but the reality is much different. How big should the table be? What size blade should you use? How heavy can you get away with making it? For this shootout, we’re looking specifically to find the best portable jobsite table saw.
Jet has a strong reputation for providing customers with durable power tools that operate just like professional models but cost less, and that is definitely true of this 10-inch table saw that comes with a riving knife. You’ll like the basic design of this model, which has an intuitive design that allows you to set it up and start cutting faster. It features both a solid cabinet as well as an extension table that stretches out from one end.
The cabinet saw available on the market today is the SawStop ICS51230-52 5 HP 230V 60 Hz Cabinet Saw with 52-Inch Industrial T-Glide Fence System, which comes with the longest fence system that you’ll find. Not only is that system easy to use, but it allows you to make different types of cuts and change the orientation or angle of the wood to the blade.
Last but not least, you need to pay attention to the dust collecting capabilities of a particular model. Portable units usually have a weak dust-collecting capacity, but they aren’t foreseen for large projects. However, all other types do feature some kind of dust collecting system. The first thing you should check is the diameter of the dust port. The larger it is, the less debris you’ll have flying around. Also, check out the vacuum requirements because some models work only with super-expensive vacuums. As you can assume, the thing that’s lacking with those models is cost efficiency. However, if you don’t have budget limitations, feel free to invest in a high-end vacuum, it makes a huge difference.
We put our hands on 10 of the most popular table saws and tested them for accuracy, power, and functionality. It took some time, but we have some fairly conclusive results. Table saws are undeniably the kings of rip cuts on the jobsite and in shops. The concept is simple: Place a motor below a solid table to turn a blade somewhere in the 4000-5000 RPM range through the surface and watch the sawdust fly. The idea may be simple, but the reality is much different. How big should the table be? What size blade should you use? How heavy can you get away with making it? For this shootout, we’re looking specifically to find the best portable jobsite table saw.
Our biggest surprise while running the best table saw review tests was in the cutting power and the quality of cut: There wasn’t much difference among them. All these saws ripped through 3-in.-thick oak without hesitating. We tried this test with the stock blades that came on the saws. Then we repeated the test using a top-quality blade in each saw.
This Portable Table saw includes an industry standard This Portable Table saw includes an industry standard tool-free split guard design that allows a true rise-and fall riving knife by using a lever on the inside the throat plate. It has a Tool-less assembly for the riving knife and anti-kickback pawls. It's perfect for mobile contractors and the Do-It-Yourself ...  More + Product Details Close
For any kind of professional woodworking and large scale construction work, the cabinet table saw is the one for the job. These types of table saws are often called stationary saws. The motor is protected in a cast iron and steel cabinet that reduces noise and vibration as well. With reduced vibration comes better accuracy which is always the desired effect, especially for professionals. The motor us a powerful 3-5 hp and requires a 220-volt outlet. If you are using it in a home workshop, a special outlet may need to be installed if 220s are not already installed in your garage or shop. Measuring about 28” x 43” and weighing in at over 400 pounds, these table saws were not designed to be portable. The large work surface is ideal for cutting large pieces with ease. Cabinet saws can use a 12” blade with no problem, although a 10” blade is the most commonly used. It is the most expensive of all of the styles of table saws.

If you don't need a stand, a benchtop table saw can be an economical and practical choice. The DeWalt DW745 (Est. $300) isn't covered in any professional tests, but it gets excellent reviews from users. This saw is limited somewhat by its small size, as it has only a 20-inch rip capacity and can't make dado cuts. Nonetheless, it earns very high ratings at Amazon with an overall rating of 4.6 stars based on nearly 2,000 reviews. Meanwhile, the more than 600 that weigh in at Home Depot like it even a touch more, granting it a rating of 4.8 stars, with recommendations from 98 percent of users. Owners like its rack-and-pinion fence – the same design found on the larger DeWalt – which they say is accurate and very easy to adjust. Its light, portable size (just 45 pounds) is also a plus. However, like the DeWalt DWE7491RS, it gets a thumbs-down for its flimsy, awkward miter gauge and occasional quality-control problems.

From there, the rest of the saws created a top tier of cutting power that wasn’t mind-blowingly better, but definitely noticeable. It took many cuts back and forth between saws to determine which came out ahead of other because they are so close to each other. Bosch’s REAXX took third place overall with SawStop ever so slightly ahead. Part of that simply came down to the fact that SawStop was a little bit smoother cutting. Coming out on top was Ridgid. There was noticeable vibration compared to Bosch and SawStop here, but it was able to muscle through each cut a little bit better than the other two.
One of the lightest and most compact table saws was also the most stable: Skilsaw. There’s no wheel base to the stand and the outward angled legs provide a wider platform than it may appear against its colleagues. In second place was DeWalt, also offering a wide platform, but without the amount of rigidity that Skilsaw has in their stand. Coming up in third was Bosch with its gravity rise stand followed closely by Ridgid. It’s important to note that none of the professional class table saws had any stability issues inherent to their extension locking—it was all in the stand.
A gauge will allow you to make very detailed cross and angled cuts. This is a bit of kit that you need to research in great depth as it can make or break the accuracy of your cuts and angles. With a good gauge, you can check blade height, blade angles, miter angles and much more. For further reading checkout Wikipedia’s table saw page and for in-depth air compressor reviews.
This table saw isn’t going to provide near vibration-free performance, and you have to be extra careful about kickback since the base is not as heavy or weighted like a standard cabinet saw. Provided you are careful and work slowly though, it is possible to replicate the precisions of a heavy duty cabinet saw on the job site using DeWalt’s innovative DWE7490X.

As you probably might think a quality model must have some safety feature. This is not a toy; this is a powerful tool which can cause serious injury. That’s why, safety features like splitters, anti-kickback or riving knives are there to minimize these risks. When you have your fingers inches away from the blades that spin with a power hard to imagine, you need to be very careful. Therefore, safety features like the ones above will help you keep your hand intact.
You’ll also find that the metal roll cage base will give you extra strength and durability to work with and the rear feet will enable you to adjust the height of the machine should you be faced with the challenge of working on an uneven surface. There’s nothing the DEWALT DW7480 Compact Job-Site Table Saw can’t handle. You’ll quickly be impressed by its ability to tackle any project you throw at it and learn to appreciate it for the great tool that it is.
Higher-End Models: The higher-end table saws ranged in price but were somewher between $ 500 - $800. These had a built-in "stand system", the largest table dimensions and the largest ripping capacities (both to the left and right side of the blade). The features were similar to the lower priced models though, so you are not paying for features, from what I've noticed.

The good news is that if you already own a dust collection system or a shop vac, then you may be compatible with many models. Even if it doesn’t match the port size of your shop vac, you can often purchase converters that will make the table saw work with the system you already own. Consequently, you shouldn’t avoid a unit because it has a port size that is different from the gauge of your shop vac. This is something to look into before making a purchase, just to make sure that converters that will work with your model are being sold.

Depending on how often you work with wood and the type of wood that you use, you may find that this SawStop PCS175-PFA30 1.75-HP Professional Cabinet Saw Assembly is better suited to your needs than some of the company’s more expensive models are. This saw features a smaller base and a shorter extension table that take up less space, but you can use the fencing system to extend the size of the table working with your boards.

Love the video. It was very helpful, answered some of the questions I've had and wondered if you can expand this a bit further. I have a Thomasville bedroom set that I bought in 1981. After all of the years of my wife using hairspray, there's a layer of it on the bed's foot board and the top and leading edge of the dresser. Will this technique remove the hair spray and restore the finish? I tried using denatured alcohol to clean it in the past but stopped short of using a sanding pad or working it to the point that nit was anything but tacky. Sounds like I didn't work it long enough. Am I right or do I need to do something else? These areas are the only bad spots on any of the 5 pieces of the set. Thanks!

×